See a Demo

Your Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

By providing training to employees in their rights under the FLSA, you can prevent confusion on coverage of breaks, vacation, and other voluntary benefits.

CATEGORIES

Workplace Eyewash and Emergency Shower Requirements

Discover how eyewash and emergency showers help prevent long-term worker injuries, and the workplace OSHA and ANSI requirements.

Read more

Beryllium Safety

Beryllium is identified as a listed toxic substance and employers are required to protect workers from beryllium exposure in a number of ways. Learn more!

Read more

What is a Chemical Hygiene Plan and Why Does Your Lab Need it?

OSHA requires many labs in the United States to have chemical hygiene plans, or CHPs, to protect their employees from chemicals that can damage their health.

Read more

Electrical Safety for Research and Education

Electricity is a vital part of research and education facility operations, but it can also pose an extreme health hazard in those facilities.

Read more

Security Threat Awareness

While most workplaces are generally safe environments, employees should be aware of potential security threats and prevention tactics.

Read more

Globally Harmonized System (GHS)

In 2012, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) adopted new hazardous chemical labeling requirements. Almost all chemical manufacturers, importers, distributers and employers in the United States are now required to use the Globally Harmonized System of Classifying and Labeling Chemicals (GHS). This new system updated the requirements for safety data sheets (formerly Material Safety Data Sheets) and chemical labels.

Read more

Organic Peroxides in the Workplace

Organic peroxides are highly useful chemicals which are used in a wide range of laboratory and plastics manufacturing applications. They are also unstable and require care during transportation, handling and storage.

Read more

How Does OSHA Protect Laboratory Workers from Bloodborne Pathogens?

As part of the bloodborne pathogens, or BBP standard, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, requires many workplaces to have policies and controls in place to protect employees from cuts, needlestick injuries and exposure to blood borne pathogens. While OSHA regulations do not apply to every lab environment or work position, these guidelines can form the basis for safe work practices that every lab can follow.

Read more