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SafetySkills Microlearning Courses

12 and 15-Passenger Van: DOT Audit Inspections

The U.S. Department of Transportation, or DOT, creates regulatory requirements for commercial drivers and the companies that employ them. There are situations where drivers of 12 and 15-passenger vans will be considered commercial vehicles, and must comply with DOT requirements. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize how to properly participate in a DOT audit inspection. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-1.2 DOT Requirements for 12 and 15-Passenger Van Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 385

12 and 15-Passenger Van: DOT Documentation Requirements

The U.S. Department of Transportation, or DOT, creates regulatory requirements for commercial drivers and the companies that employ them. There are situations where drivers of 12 and 15-passenger vans will be considered commercial vehicles, and must comply with DOT requirements. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize DOT documentation requirements for qualified drivers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-1.2 DOT Requirements for 12 and 15-Passenger Van Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 380 Subpart E

12 and 15-Passenger Van: DOT Recordkeeping Requirements

The U.S. Department of Transportation, or DOT, creates regulatory requirements for commercial drivers and the companies that employ them. There are situations where drivers of 12 and 15-passenger vans will be considered commercial vehicles, and must comply with DOT requirements. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify DOT requirements for record retention. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-1.2 DOT Requirements for 12 and 15-Passenger Van Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 379, Appendix A

12 and 15-Passenger Van: DOT Requirements for Drivers

The U.S. Department of Transportation, or DOT, creates regulatory requirements for commercial drivers and the companies that employ them. There are situations where drivers of 12 and 15-passenger vans will be considered commercial vehicles, and must comply with DOT requirements. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify requirements for commercial drivers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-1.2 DOT Requirements for 12 and 15-Passenger Van Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 380 Subpart E

12 and 15-Passenger Van: DOT Vehicle Inspections

The U.S. Department of Transportation, or DOT, creates regulatory requirements for commercial drivers and the companies that employ them. There are situations where drivers of 12 and 15-passenger vans will be considered commercial vehicles, and must comply with DOT requirements. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify DOT vehicle inspection requirements. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-1.2 DOT Requirements for 12 and 15-Passenger Van Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 396

Accident Prevention Sign and Tag Requirements

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires the use of signs and symbols to warn workers about specific hazards in the workplace and tell them how to prevent these hazards from causing harm or injury to employees. The design of these signs is standardized across all types of workplaces so that workers can easily understand their meanings. Workers need to understand the rules that govern safety signs and recognize the meanings of common symbols and colors in order to protect themselves and others from harm. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the requirements for accident prevention signs and tags outlined by OSHA and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-45.2 Accident Prevention Signs and Tags.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.145, 29 CFR 1926.200, ANSI 13.1-2011

Accident Procedures

Mechanical failure, other drivers, animals, and other unexpected circumstances can all surprise even the best drivers, leading to an accident. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize how to respond if they are in a motor vehicle accident. This course is intended for employees who, as a part of their regular work duties, are required to operate a motor vehicle on public roads.

Aerial Lift Safety: Aerial Lift Basics

Aerial lifts are typically used to provide workers with access to a workspace that is temporarily inaccessible, usually due to height restraints. They are used in maintenance and construction work, but also by emergency rescue personnel. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify standard types of aerial lifts and their features. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BSS-2.2 Aerial Lift Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.453; OSHA 29 CFR 1926.454

Aerial Lift Safety: Aerial Lift Hazards

Aerial lifts are typically used to provide workers with access to a workspace that is temporarily inaccessible, usually due to height restraints. They are used in maintenance and construction work, but also by emergency rescue personnel. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize common hazards on aerial lifts. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BSS-2.2 Aerial Lift Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.453; OSHA 29 CFR 1926.454

Aerial Lift Safety: Safe Lift Operation

Aerial lifts are typically used to provide workers with access to a workspace that is temporarily inaccessible, usually due to height restraints. They are used in maintenance and construction work, but also by emergency rescue personnel. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize proper safe operating procedures on aerial lifts. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BSS-2.2 Aerial Lift Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.453; OSHA 29 CFR 1926.454

Autoclave Safety

Autoclaves use high-pressure steam to sterilize materials. This can cause significant burns if you don’t take precautions or use the machine improperly. Autoclaves can also damage or destroy equipment if they’re not properly prepared. This course will give lab workers an overview of the hazards associated with autoclaves and recommended safe practices for using autoclaves.

Relevant Standards: OSHA’s General Duty Clause

Behavior Based Safety: Characteristics of a BBS Program

The root causes of incidents are not always obvious, but they are often caused in some part by one or more unsafe behaviors. Behavior-based safety, or BBS, is a method used to identify and change unsafe behaviors in a workplace. At the successful completion of this course, learners should be able to define BBS and recognize the safety triad. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBS-1 Behavior Based Safety.

Behavior Based Safety: Creating a Successful BBS Program

The root causes of incidents are not always obvious, but they are often caused in some part by one or more unsafe behaviors. Behavior-based safety, or BBS, is a method used to identify and change unsafe behaviors in a workplace. At the completion of this course, learners should be able to identify the components of a successful BBS program. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBS-1 Behavior Based Safety.

Beryllium Awareness – Characteristics and Effects

Beryllium is a strong, versatile metal that has a number of commercial uses. Unfortunately beryllium is also highly toxic. While most workers will never encounter beryllium hazards on the job, those workers who must deal with it directly in certain production and manufacturing settings can face substantial risks to their health. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the characteristics and effects of beryllium. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-7.2 Beryllium Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1024

Beryllium Awareness – Cross-Contamination Controls

Beryllium is a strong, versatile metal that has a number of commercial uses. Unfortunately beryllium is also highly toxic. While most workers will never encounter beryllium hazards on the job, those workers who must deal with it directly in certain production and manufacturing settings can face substantial risks to their health. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify workplace controls to prevent beryllium cross-contamination. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-7.2 Beryllium Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1024

Beryllium Awareness – Exposure Assessment and Control Plans

Beryllium is a strong, versatile metal that has a number of commercial uses. Unfortunately beryllium is also highly toxic. While most workers will never encounter beryllium hazards on the job, those workers who must deal with it directly in certain production and manufacturing settings can face substantial risks to their health. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify aspects of exposure assessment and control plans. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-7.2 Beryllium Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1024

Beryllium Awareness – Exposure Controls

Beryllium is a strong, versatile metal that has a number of commercial uses. Unfortunately beryllium is also highly toxic. While most workers will never encounter beryllium hazards on the job, those workers who must deal with it directly in certain production and manufacturing settings can face substantial risks to their health. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify workplace controls to prevent beryllium exposure. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-7.2 Beryllium Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1024

Beryllium Awareness – Medical Surveillance

Beryllium is a strong, versatile metal that has a number of commercial uses. Unfortunately beryllium is also highly toxic. While most workers will never encounter beryllium hazards on the job, those workers who must deal with it directly in certain production and manufacturing settings can face substantial risks to their health. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s medical surveillance requirements for beryllium. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-7.2 Beryllium Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1024

Beryllium Awareness – OSHA’s Beryllium Rule

Beryllium is a strong, versatile metal that has a number of commercial uses. Unfortunately beryllium is also highly toxic. While most workers will never encounter beryllium hazards on the job, those workers who must deal with it directly in certain production and manufacturing settings can face substantial risks to their health. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s requirements for beryllium protection on the job. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-7.2 Beryllium Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1024

Bloodborne Pathogens Canada: Characteristics

Many employees come in contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials during daily duties and thus are potentially exposed to this occupational hazard. This course will teach employees about the characteristics of bloodborne pathogens. This awareness-level course is designed for all workers who may be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) at any time during the performance of their regular job duties. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2 Bloodborne Pathogens.

Bloodborne Pathogens Canada: Cleaning and Disinfecting

Many employees come in contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials during daily duties and thus are potentially exposed to this occupational hazard. This course will teach employees safe work practices for handling, cleaning and decontamination. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2can.

Bloodborne Pathogens Canada: Exposure Control

Many employees come in contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials during daily duties and thus are potentially exposed to this occupational hazard. This course will teach employees the basic controls to minimize exposure hazards. This awareness-level course is designed for all workers who may be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) at any time during the performance of their regular job duties. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2can.

Bloodborne Pathogens Canada: Protocols and Recordkeeping

Many employees come in contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials during daily duties and thus are potentially exposed to this occupational hazard. This course will teach employees how to recognize exposure protocols. This awareness-level course is designed for all workers who may be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) at any time during the performance of their regular job duties. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2can.

Bloodborne Pathogens Canada: Routes of Transmission

Many employees come in contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials during daily duties and thus are potentially exposed to this occupational hazard. This course will teach employees how pathogens are transmitted. This awareness-level course is designed for all workers who may be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) at any time during the performance of their regular job duties. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2can.

Bloodborne Pathogens: Characteristics

Bloodborne pathogens are pathogens that are present in blood or other potentially infectious materials. In this course, employees will learn about the characteristics of bloodborne pathogens and the risks they pose. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2 Bloodborne Pathogens.

Relevant Standards: OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 29 CFR § 1910.1030

Bloodborne Pathogens: Cleaning and Disinfecting

Bloodborne pathogens are pathogens that are present in blood or other potentially infectious materials. In this course, employees will learn cleaning and disinfecting practices for bloodborne pathogens. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2 Bloodborne Pathogens.

Relevant Standards: OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 29 CFR § 1910.1030

Bloodborne Pathogens: Exposure Control

Bloodborne pathogens are pathogens that are present in blood or other potentially infectious materials. In this course, employees will learn how to limit exposure to bloodborne pathogens. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2 Bloodborne Pathogens.

Relevant Standards: OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 29 CFR § 1910.1030

Bloodborne Pathogens: Protocols and Recordkeeping

Bloodborne pathogens are pathogens that are present in blood or other potentially infectious materials. In this course, employees will learn proper procedures to take if exposed to bloodborne pathogens as well as proper recordkeeping procedures. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2 Bloodborne Pathogens.

Relevant Standards: OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 29 CFR § 1910.1030

Bloodborne Pathogens: Routes of Transmission

Bloodborne pathogens are pathogens that are present in blood or other potentially infectious materials. In this course, employees will learn how bloodborne pathogens are transmitted.This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BBP-1.2 Bloodborne Pathogens.

Relevant Standards: OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 29 CFR § 1910.1030

Bottom-Up Gowning Procedures for Laboratory and Research Facilities

Laboratories and research facilities often use controlled environments to prevent contamination of research and production activities. One standard control used in such environments is requiring students and employees working in those facilities to don gowning equipment before entering. This course covers “bottom-up” gowning procedures for laboratories and research facilities, including preparation, hand hygiene, types of gowning equipment, and donning and doffing procedures for gowning equipment. Bottom-up procedures are most commonly used in compounding facilities. This course is designed for all employees or students working in laboratory or research controlled environments that use a bottom-up gowning approach.

Carbon Monoxide: Controls to Prevent Exposure

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is lighter than air. High concentrations of carbon monoxide can interfere with the oxygen-carrying capacity of the bloodstream, and prolonged exposure can cause serious injury and death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that carbon monoxide poisoning kills more than 400 people and hospitalizes 4,000 every year. Workers who successfully complete this course should be able to identify workplace controls to prevent carbon monoxide exposure. This microlearning course is a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-8.2 Carbon Monoxide Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1000; 29 CFR 1917.24

Carbon Monoxide: Exposure Symptoms and Treatment

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is lighter than air. High concentrations of carbon monoxide can interfere with the oxygen-carrying capacity of the bloodstream, and prolonged exposure can cause serious injury and death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that carbon monoxide poisoning kills more than 400 people and hospitalizes 4,000 every year. Workers who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize symptoms of and treatment for carbon monoxide exposure. This microlearning course is a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-8.2 Carbon Monoxide Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1000; 29 CFR 1917.24

Carbon Monoxide: Properties and Sources

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is lighter than air. High concentrations of carbon monoxide can interfere with the oxygen-carrying capacity of the bloodstream, and prolonged exposure can cause serious injury and death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that carbon monoxide poisoning kills more than 400 people and hospitalizes 4,000 every year. Workers who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the chemical properties and sources of carbon monoxide. This microlearning course is a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-8.2 Carbon Monoxide Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1000; 29 CFR 1917.24

Chainsaw Safety: Before Using a Chainsaw

A chainsaw is a useful tool in many industries, but operating a chainsaw can be dangerous if the right precautions are not taken. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are about 36,000 chainsaw-related injuries each year. The risk of injury can be minimized by using safe operating procedures and wearing the proper personal protective equipment, or PPE. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize necessary precautions and PPE before starting a chainsaw. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HPT-2.2 Chainsaw Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.266; 29 CFR 1910.135(a)(1); 29 CFR 1910.133(a)(1); 29 CFR 1910.95(b)(1); 29 CFR 1910.138(a)

Chainsaw Safety: Safe Operations

A chainsaw is a useful tool in many industries, but operating a chainsaw can be dangerous if the right precautions are not taken. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are about 36,000 chainsaw-related injuries each year. The risk of injury can be minimized by using safe operating procedures and wearing the proper personal protective equipment, or PPE. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize safe operating procedures for chainsaws. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HPT-2.2 Chainsaw Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.266; 29 CFR 1910.135(a)(1); 29 CFR 1910.133(a)(1); 29 CFR 1910.95(b)(1); 29 CFR 1910.138(a)

Chemical Hygiene Plan: Purpose and Components

A lot of important scientific research and development is done in laboratories, and a lot of people depend on their work. However, there can be several hazards to lab workers, particularly chemical hazards. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires labs to create a formalized chemical hygiene plan to help protect lab employees from chemical hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course will display the ability to recognize the purpose and components of a chemical hygiene plan. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see LAB-2.2 Chemical Hygiene Plan.

Relevant Standards: OSH Act Section 5(a)(1) General Duty Clause; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart Z

Chemical Hygiene Plan: Roles and Responsibilities

A lot of important scientific research and development is done in laboratories, and a lot of people depend on their work. However, there can be several hazards to lab workers, particularly chemical hazards. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires labs to create a formalized chemical hygiene plan to help protect lab employees from chemical hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course will display the ability to identify typical employer and employee responsibilities included in a chemical hygiene plan. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see LAB-2.2 Chemical Hygiene Plan.

Relevant Standards: OSH Act Section 5(a)(1) General Duty Clause; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart Z

Chemical Safety – Chemical Hazards

OSHA estimates thirty-two million employees work with at least one chemical hazard every day. Employees who take this course should be able to recognize hazards associates with common chemicals. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2 Chemical Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H

Chemical Safety – Emergency Procedures

OSHA estimates thirty-two million employees work with at least one chemical hazard every day. Employees who take this course should be able to identify recommended emergency procedures in facilities where chemicals are present. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2 Chemical Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H

Chemical Safety – Handling and Storage

OSHA estimates thirty-two million employees work with at least one chemical hazard every day. Employees who take this course should be able to identify required safe handling and storage measures. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2 Chemical Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H

Chemical Safety – Hazard Controls

OSHA estimates thirty-two million employees work with at least one chemical hazard every day. Employees who take this course should be able to identify the importance of safety controls when working with chemicals. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2 Chemical Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H

Chemical Safety – Tools and Strategies

OSHA estimates thirty-two million employees work with at least one chemical hazard every day. Employees who take this course should be able to recognize chemical safety tools and strategies. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2 Chemical Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H

Chemical Safety Canada – Chemical Hazards

There are nearly six hundred and fifty thousand chemical products available today, and hundreds more introduced every year. Employees who take this course should be able to recognize hazards associated with common chemicals. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2can Chemical Safety – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), PPE and other federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Chemical Safety Canada – Emergency Procedures

There are nearly six hundred and fifty thousand chemical products available today, and hundreds more introduced every year. identify recommended emergency procedures in facilities where chemicals are present. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2can Chemical Safety – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), PPE and other federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Chemical Safety Canada – Handling and Storage

There are nearly six hundred and fifty thousand chemical products available today, and hundreds more introduced every year. Employees who take this course should be able to identify required safe handling and storage measures. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2can Chemical Safety – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), PPE and other federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Chemical Safety Canada – Hazard Controls

There are nearly six hundred and fifty thousand chemical products available today, and hundreds more introduced every year. Employees who take this course should be able to identify the importance of safety controls when working with chemicals. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2can Chemical Safety – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), PPE and other federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Chemical Safety Canada – Tools and Strategies

There are nearly six hundred and fifty thousand chemical products available today, and hundreds more introduced every year. Employees who take this course should be able to recognize chemical safety tools and strategies. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CHM-1.2can Chemical Safety – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), PPE and other federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

CMV Inspections: Levels of DOT Inspections

All vehicles classified as commercial motor vehicles, or CMVs, are required to undergo several types of inspections by the Department of Transportation, or DOT, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, or FMCSA. Inspections ensure the safety of drivers, vehicles, cargo and the public. Violations found during DOT inspections can result in fines, vehicles being placed out of service until issues are corrected, or driver’s license revocations. This course will help learners identify commercial motor vehicle inspection levels as outlined in the North American Standard Inspection Criteria. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-3.2 Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 396; North American Standard Inspection Criteria

CMV Inspections: Preparing for DOT Inspections

All vehicles classified as commercial motor vehicles, or CMVs, are required to undergo several types of inspections by the Department of Transportation, or DOT, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, or FMCSA. Inspections ensure the safety of drivers, vehicles, cargo and the public. Violations found during DOT inspections can result in fines, vehicles being placed out of service until issues are corrected, or driver’s license revocations. This course will help learners identify recommended practices for preparing for inspections. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-3.2 Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 396

CMV Inspections: Types of CMV Inspections

All vehicles classified as commercial motor vehicles, or CMVs, are required to undergo several types of inspections by the Department of Transportation, or DOT, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, or FMCSA. Inspections ensure the safety of drivers, vehicles, cargo and the public. Violations found during DOT inspections can result in fines, vehicles being placed out of service until issues are corrected, or driver’s license revocations. This course will help learners identify types of commercial motor vehicle inspections. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-3.2 Commercial Motor Vehicle Inspections.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 396

Cold Stress in the Workplace: Cold Stress Prevention

People who work outdoors or in cold indoor environments such as walk-in freezers are frequently subject to cold, wet working conditions. Working in wet or cold environments can take a heavy toll on workers’ bodies and be hazardous to their health. Workers who work in wet in cold or wet environments must be able to prepare to work in these conditions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify controls that can help prevent cold stress. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CSW-1.2 Cold Stress in the Workplace.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act

Cold Stress in the Workplace: Contributing Factors

People who work outdoors or in cold indoor environments such as walk-in freezers are frequently subject to cold, wet working conditions. Working in wet or cold environments can take a heavy toll on workers’ bodies and be hazardous to their health. Workers who work in wet in cold or wet environments must be able to prepare to work in these conditions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify factors that contribute to cold stress. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CSW-1.2 Cold Stress in the Workplace.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act

Cold Stress in the Workplace: Symptoms and Illnesses

People who work outdoors or in cold indoor environments such as walk-in freezers are frequently subject to cold, wet working conditions. Working in wet or cold environments can take a heavy toll on workers’ bodies and be hazardous to their health. Workers who work in wet in cold or wet environments must be able to prepare to work in these conditions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize signs and symptoms of cold stress. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CSW-1.2 Cold Stress in the Workplace.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act

Confined Space Canada: Duties and Responsibilities

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to… This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2can Confined Space Awareness – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Confined space requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations

Confined Space Canada: Emergency Procedures

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to… This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2can Confined Space Awareness – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Confined space requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations

Confined Space Canada: Hazard Controls

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to… This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2can Confined Space Awareness – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Confined space requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations

Confined Space Canada: Hazards in Confined Spaces

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to… This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2can Confined Space Awareness – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Confined space requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations

Confined Space Canada: Types of Confined Spaces

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify types of permit-required and non-permit confined spaces. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2can Confined Space Awareness – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Confined space requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations

Confined Space Entry Supervisor – Supervisor Responsibilities

Confined space work is very hazardous, and proper procedures need to be followed to ensure worker safety. This course is designed to provide workers with an awareness of the roles and responsibilities associated with permit-required confined space entry. In this course, employees will be given information on the different roles and responsibilities of confined space entry, the OSHA requirements for confined space entry permits, and the requirements for atmospheric testing of confined spaces. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-2.2 Confined Space Entry Supervisor.

Relevant Standards: This course is designed for employees involved in supervising confined space entry operations in any industry.

Confined Space Oil and Gas: Confined Space Hazards

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. On oil and gas sites, employees often work in confined spaces such as manholes, pipelines, storage tanks, and mud pits. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize potential hazards in confined spaces. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-8.2 Confined Space and Engulfment Awareness for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H, 1910.124; Subpart J, 1910.146 (Appendices A-F); Subpart Q

Confined Space Oil and Gas: Duties and Responsibilities

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. On oil and gas sites, employees often work in confined spaces such as manholes, pipelines, storage tanks, and mud pits. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recall assigned duties and responsibilities for confined space work. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-8.2 Confined Space and Engulfment Awareness for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.146

Confined Space Oil and Gas: Emergency Procedures

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. On oil and gas sites, employees often work in confined spaces such as manholes, pipelines, storage tanks, and mud pits. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize emergency procedures for confined space entry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-8.2 Confined Space and Engulfment Awareness for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.146; 1910.146 Appendix F

Confined Space Oil and Gas: Hazard Controls

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. On oil and gas sites, employees often work in confined spaces such as manholes, pipelines, storage tanks, and mud pits. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify hazard controls for confined space work. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-8.2 Confined Space and Engulfment Awareness for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart J, 1910.146 (Appendices A-F); Subpart Q, Subpart R

Confined Space Oil and Gas: Types of Confined Spaces

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. On oil and gas sites, employees often work in confined spaces such as manholes, pipelines, storage tanks, and mud pits. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify types of permit-required and non-permit required confined spaces. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-8.2 Confined Space and Engulfment Awareness for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.146

Confined Space: Assigned Duties and Responsibilities

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. OSHA requires employers to take special precautions to ensure worker safety. They must correct all known hazards and create a system for identifying new hazards. All employees working in or around confined spaces must be trained on the hazards that exist in the space and on the signs, symptoms and consequences of exposure to those hazards, and their roles in confined space work. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify assigned duties and responsibilities in and around confined spaces. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2 Confined Space Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146

Confined Space: Emergency Procedures

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees general emergency procedures associated with confined space work. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2 Confined Space Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146

Confined Space: Hazard Controls

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces, with a heavy emphasis on OSHA safety requirements. Employees will learn how to identify confined spaces, their hazards, and methods used to control those hazards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2 Confined Space Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146

Confined Space: Hazards in Confined Spaces

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces, with a heavy emphasis on OSHA safety requirements. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify hazards of confined spaces. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2 Confined Space Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146

Confined Space: Types of Confined Spaces

Confined spaces are some of the most hazardous work environments. This course will teach employees the hazards and safety precautions associated with confined spaces, with a heavy emphasis on OSHA safety requirements. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify types of permit-required and non-permit required confined spaces. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CFS-1.2 Confined Space Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.146

Contractors in Oil and Gas: Company and Site-specific Policies

Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this safety snippet should be able to recognize company and site-specific contractor policies. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-59.2 Contractor Orientation for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Contractors in Oil and Gas: Environmental and Emergency Response

Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this safety snippet should be able to identify environmental and emergency response considerations. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-59.2 Contractor Orientation for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Contractors in Oil and Gas: General Hazards

Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this safety snippet should be able to identify general hazards on oil and gas sites. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-59.2 Contractor Orientation for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Contractors in Oil and Gas: General Safety Programs

Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this safety snippet should be able to identify general safety programs on oil and gas sites. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-59.2 Contractor Orientation for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Contractors in Oil and Gas: Hazard Controls

Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this safety snippet should be able to recognize hazard controls to protect personnel. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-59.2 Contractor Orientation for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Contractors in Oil and Gas: Permit-Required Work Tasks

Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this safety snippet should be able to identify permit-required work tasks. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-59.2 Contractor Orientation for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Contractors in Oil and Gas: Specific Hazards

Work in the oil and gas industry takes a lot of manpower, so oil and gas companies often hire contractors to perform specialized work tasks. These host companies rely on the contractors to work safely and abide by their own company policies, as well as federal, state, and local laws. Learners who successfully complete this safety snippet should be able to identify specific hazards on oil and gas sites. This course is designed for workers in the oil and gas industry. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-59.2 Contractor Orientation for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Controlled Environments and Cleanrooms in Laboratory and Research Facilities

A controlled environment is an enclosed area, such as a room, where measures are being taken to control certain parameters of the environment, most commonly to ensure the integrity of research data, control the production of sensitive products, or protect against dangerous contamination. Cleanrooms are controlled environments where exceptional measures are being taken to control environmental conditions as much as feasibly possible. Keeping a cleanroom controlled requires workers to take measures to control contamination. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize the standard methods for controlling contaminants in a controlled environment.

CPR Refresher

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, is a life-saving skill. As with any skill, occasional practice and review is necessary to properly perform a skill. This course will give employees who have already been trained to perform CPR a review of CPR’s major procedures. Employees will review how CPR works, when CPR should be performed and how to properly perform it. This course is designed for employees who have already been trained to perform CPR and need a general review of the major CPR procedures. Employees that have never been trained on CPR and require training should receive it from an instructor in person.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.151

Crane Safety – Hand Signals

Cranes are designed to carry material all over large warehouses and factory floors, making them a valuable time-saving tool. Controlling the crane from one spot makes it difficult to see what the load is doing at all times, though. Most crane operators usually have riggers directing their load, and most will stay in contact via two-way radios or other electronic means, but crane operators and riggers need to have a system of hand signals in case the electronic systems break down. Designed for crane operators and riggers, this module will teach employees the standard OSHA-recommended hand signals. This module covers the same information regarding hand signals that is covered in our Crane Safety course. It has been provided as a stand-alone module for learners who only need this portion of the training. This course is presented in English and Spanish.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.179

Delivery Driver Safety: Driving Safely

Delivery drivers have to deal with numerous hazards, particularly motor vehicle accidents. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize procedures for driving delivery vehicles in a safe and secure manner. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-5.2 Delivery Driver Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Delivery Driver Safety: Working Safely

Delivery drivers have to deal with numerous hazards, including ergonomic injuries from lifting and carrying and robbery-related violence. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize procedures for delivering products in a safe and secure manner. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-5.2 Delivery Driver Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Disease Prevention for the Tattoo Industry

Tattooing has become a pretty common practice, but there are potential health hazards when equipment isn’t properly cleaned and sterilized. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify the common types of bloodborne pathogens present in tattoo industry settings and recommended measures used to prevent transmission. This course is intended for entry-level employees who will work in any business in which tattooing takes place. This course does not certify employees on bloodborne pathogens or first aid. SafetySkills does offer additional training on these subjects, but employees may also require certification from state or local officials to practice tattooing.

Relevant Standards: OSHA’s General Duty Clause 5 (a)(1)

Distracted Driving Prevention

Most people understand that distracted driving is a bad thing, but nearly everyone does it in some form or another. Almost 20% of vehicle crashes occur as a result of a distracted driver. Learners that successfully complete this course will be able to identify the common causes of hazardous driver distractions and methods for minimizing or eliminating them. This course is intended for employees who, as part of their regular work duties, are required to operate a motor vehicle on public roads. This course is presented in English and Spanish.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause 5(a)(1) of the OSHA Act

Driver Safety: Hazardous Driving Conditions

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that 30,000 to 35,000 people are killed and 3 million people are injured in vehicle crashes every year. This course will teach employees who drive on company business safe driving habits and defensive driving methods. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-1.2 Driver Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Driver Safety: Preventing Hazardous Driving

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that 30,000 to 35,000 people are killed and 3 million people are injured in vehicle crashes every year. This course will teach employees who drive on company business safe driving habits and defensive driving methods. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-1.2 Driver Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Driver Safety: Safe and Defensive Driving

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that 30,000 to 35,000 people are killed and 3 million people are injured in vehicle crashes every year. This course will teach employees who drive on company business safe driving habits and defensive driving methods. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-1.2 Driver Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Drug Free Workplace: Consequences of Substance Abuse

The U.S. Surgeon General reports that nearly 21 million Americans live with substance abuse disorders, costing the U.S. economy more than $400 billion annually. Substance abuse is a problem that can seriously affect all employees in the workplace. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the dangers and consequences of substance abuse and addiction. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-8.2 Drug Free Workplace.

Relevant Standards: Various State and Federal Laws

Drug Free Workplace: Substance Addiction

The U.S. Surgeon General reports that nearly 21 million Americans live with substance abuse disorders, costing the U.S. economy more than $400 billion annually. Substance abuse is a problem that can seriously affect all employees in the workplace. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize signs of substance abuse and addiction. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-8.2 Drug Free Workplace.

Relevant Standards: Various State and Federal Laws

Drug Free Workplace: Workplace Drug Policies

The U.S. Surgeon General reports that nearly 21 million Americans live with substance abuse disorders, costing the U.S. economy more than $400 billion annually. Substance abuse is a problem that can seriously affect all employees in the workplace. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common elements of workplace drug-free policies. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-8.2 Drug Free Workplace.

Relevant Standards: Various State and Federal Laws

Earthquake Safety – Characteristics and Preparation

Earthquakes are sudden, rapid shaking in the earth’s crust caused by tectonic plate movement and other seismic activity. Earthquakes can cause property damage, injuries and even death. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates that a large earthquake in a major U.S. metro area could cause as much as $200 billion in damage. An earthquake can be followed by aftershocks, tsunamis, landslides and other events that can cause further damage. Because earthquakes can occur without warning, it’s important for people to know how to react if an earthquake impacts their area. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize characteristics of earthquakes and steps to prepare for them. This microlearning course represents a part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-2.2 Earthquake Safety.

Earthquake Safety – Safe Steps After a Quake

Earthquakes are sudden, rapid shaking in the earth’s crust caused by tectonic plate movement and other seismic activity. Earthquakes can cause property damage, injuries and even death. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates that a large earthquake in a major U.S. metro area could cause as much as $200 billion in damage. An earthquake can be followed by aftershocks, tsunamis, landslides and other events that can cause further damage. Because earthquakes can occur without warning, it’s important for people to know how to react if an earthquake impacts their area. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safe steps to take after an earthquake. This microlearning course represents a part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-2.2 Earthquake Safety.

Earthquake Safety – Safe Steps During a Quake

Earthquakes are sudden, rapid shaking in the earth’s crust caused by tectonic plate movement and other seismic activity. Earthquakes can cause property damage, injuries and even death. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) estimates that a large earthquake in a major U.S. metro area could cause as much as $200 billion in damage. An earthquake can be followed by aftershocks, tsunamis, landslides and other events that can cause further damage. Because earthquakes can occur without warning, it’s important for people to know how to react if an earthquake impacts their area. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safe steps to take during an earthquake. This microlearning course represents a part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-2.2 Earthquake Safety.

Electrical Safety Above 601 Volts: Basics and Roles

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that there are approximately 2,300 electrical-related injuries and 186 electrical-related fatalities each year in the U.S. As little as 6 milliamperes is enough to cause pain and loss of muscle control, making it critical for employers and employees to be aware of and respect the dangers of electricity. Certain employees work with or around high voltage electricity at or above 601 volts. These employees and their employers must take special precautions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the basic concepts of electricity and employee roles. This microlearning course presents a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-3.2 Electrical Safety Above 601 Volts.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E; 1910.269, 302, 303; 1926.960

Electrical Safety Above 601 Volts: High Voltage Hazards

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that there are approximately 2,300 electrical-related injuries and 186 electrical-related fatalities each year in the U.S. As little as 6 milliamperes is enough to cause pain and loss of muscle control, making it critical for employers and employees to be aware of and respect the dangers of electricity. Certain employees work with or around high voltage electricity at or above 601 volts. These employees and their employers must take special precautions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common hazards associated with high voltage. This microlearning course presents a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-3.2 Electrical Safety Above 601 Volts.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E; 1910.269, 302, 303; 1926.960

Electrical Safety Above 601 Volts: Safe Work Practices

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that there are approximately 2,300 electrical-related injuries and 186 electrical-related fatalities each year in the U.S. As little as 6 milliamperes is enough to cause pain and loss of muscle control, making it critical for employers and employees to be aware of and respect the dangers of electricity. Certain employees work with or around high voltage electricity at or above 601 volts. These employees and their employers must take special precautions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safe work practices for working with or around high-voltage electricity. This microlearning course presents a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-3.2 Electrical Safety Above 601 Volts.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E; 1910.269, 302, 303; 1926.960

Electrical Safety California: Control and Prevent Electrical Hazards

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought given to its potential hazards. Some employees work with electricity directly, but some work with it indirectly. This course gives learners information about hazards associated with electrical equipment in the workplace and how to use standard hazard controls. This course is geared towards California employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair. Employers can use this course to help meet the requirements of Cal/OSHA and Federal OSHA standards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CAL-4.2.

Relevant Standards: 8 CCR Sec. 3203, 8 CCR Sec. 2395, NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety California: Control and Prevent Electrical Hazards

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought given to its potential hazards. Some employees work with electricity directly, but some work with it indirectly. This course gives learners information about hazards associated with electrical equipment in the workplace and how to use standard hazard controls. This course is geared towards California employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair. Employers can use this course to help meet the requirements of Cal/OSHA and Federal OSHA standards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CAL-4.2.

Relevant Standards: 8 CCR Sec. 3203, 8 CCR Sec. 2395, NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety California: Electrical Hazards

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought given to its potential hazards. Some employees work with electricity directly, but some work with it indirectly. This course gives learners information about hazards associated with electrical equipment in the workplace. This course is geared towards California employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair. Employers can use this course to help meet the requirements of Cal/OSHA and Federal OSHA standards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CAL-4.2.

Relevant Standards: 8 CCR Sec. 3203, 8 CCR Sec. 2395, NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety California: Electrical Injuries

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought given to its potential hazards. Some employees work with electricity directly, but some work with it indirectly. Employees will learn how to recognize possible electrical injuries. This course is geared towards California employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair. Employers can use this course to help meet the requirements of Cal/OSHA and Federal OSHA standards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CAL-4.2.

Relevant Standards: 8 CCR Sec. 3203, 8 CCR Sec. 2395, NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety California: Electricity and its Dangers

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought given to its potential hazards. Some employees work with electricity directly, but some work with it indirectly. This course gives learners information about hazards associated with electrical equipment in the workplace and how to minimize or eliminate those hazards. Employees will learn how to recognize the dangers of electricity. This course is geared towards California employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair. Employers can use this course to help meet the requirements of Cal/OSHA and Federal OSHA standards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CAL-4.2.

Relevant Standards: 8 CCR Sec. 3203, 8 CCR Sec. 2395, NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety California: Qualified Electrical Workers

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought given to its potential hazards. Some employees work with electricity directly, but some work with it indirectly. This course gives learners information about qualified electrical workers. This course is geared towards California employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair. Employers can use this course to help meet the requirements of Cal/OSHA and Federal OSHA standards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see CAL-4.2.

Relevant Standards: 8 CCR Sec. 3203, 8 CCR Sec. 2395, NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety Canada – Arc Flash Characteristics

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify the conditions that could cause an arc flash. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2can Electrical Safety Canada / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: PPE and electrical safety requirements of provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations; NFPA 70E 2018

Electrical Safety Canada – Arc Flash Controls

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify controls to prevent and protect against arc flashes. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2can Electrical Safety Canada / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: PPE and electrical safety requirements of provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations; NFPA 70E 2018

Electrical Safety Canada – Arc Flash Hazards

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify the hazards of arcing electrical current. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2can Electrical Safety Canada / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: PPE and electrical safety requirements of provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations; NFPA 70E 2018

Electrical Safety Canada – Arc Flash Roles and Responsibilities

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to recognize the roles and responsibilities involved in working around arc flash hazards. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2can Electrical Safety Canada/ NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: PPE and electrical safety requirements of provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations; NFPA 70E 2018

Electrical Safety Canada – Arc-Rated Clothing

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify requirements for arc-rated clothing and personal protective equipment. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2can Electrical Safety Canada / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: PPE and electrical safety requirements of provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations; NFPA 70E 2018

Electrical Safety Canada – Work with Arc Flash Hazards

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify procedures for performing electrical work where an arc flash hazard exists. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2can Electrical Safety Canada / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: PPE and electrical safety requirements of provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations; NFPA 70E 2018

Electrical Safety Oil and Gas: Controlling Hazards

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to recognize how to use standard electrical hazard controls. This course is aimed at oil and gas employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair, and can assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s electrical safety requirements for unqualified workers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-25.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety Oil and Gas: Electricity Basics

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to recognize the basics of electricity and its dangers. This course is aimed at oil and gas employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair, and can assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s electrical safety requirements for unqualified workers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-25.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety Oil and Gas: Potential Injuries

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to recognize possible electrical injuries. This course is aimed at oil and gas employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair, and can assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s electrical safety requirements for unqualified workers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-25.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety Oil and Gas: Site Electrical Hazards

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to recognize potential electrical hazards on their site. This course is aimed at oil and gas employees who work regularly with electrical equipment, including equipment maintenance and repair, and can assist the employer in meeting OSHA’s electrical safety requirements for unqualified workers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-25.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety: Arc Flash Characteristics

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify the conditions that could cause an arc flash. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety: Arc Flash Controls

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify controls to prevent and protect against arc flashes. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety: Arc Flash Hazards

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify the hazards of arcing electrical current. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety: Arc Flash Roles and Responsibilities

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to recognize the roles and responsibilities involved in working around arc flash hazards. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety: Arc-Related Clothing

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify requirements for arc-rated clothing and personal protective equipment. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Electrical Safety: Work with Arc Flash Hazards

Arc flash can happen instantly wherever there’s electricity, and can cause severe injury or death. Learners that complete this course should be able to identify procedures for performing electrical work where an arc flash hazard exists. This microlearning course is geared towards qualified or unqualified workers who need training on arc flash, and is part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ELT-4.2 Electrical Safety / NFPA 70E – Arc Flash.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Emergency Preparedness: Emergency Action Plans

Unexpected emergencies can happen anytime, anyplace. While we can’t control when and where life-threatening emergencies happen, being prepared can minimize property damage and will greatly reduce the chances of serious injuries or death. This course will teach employees the basics of what should be in their facility’s emergency action plan. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-1.2 Emergency Response.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.38-39; 1910 Subpart E Appendix

Emergency Preparedness: Emergency Procedures

Unexpected emergencies can happen anytime, anyplace. While we can’t control when and where life-threatening emergencies happen, being prepared can minimize property damage and will greatly reduce the chances of serious injuries or death. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify procedures to follow during emergencies. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see EAP-1.2 Emergency Action Plans for Office Employees.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.38

Emergency Preparedness: Medical Emergencies

Unexpected emergencies can happen anytime, anyplace. While we can’t control when and where life-threatening emergencies happen, being prepared can minimize property damage and will greatly reduce the chances of serious injuries or death. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify considerations to take during medical emergencies. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see EAP-1.2 Emergency Action Plans for Office Employees.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.38; 29 CFR 1910.151

Emergency Preparedness: Reporting Emergencies

Unexpected emergencies can happen anytime, anyplace. While we can’t control when and where life-threatening emergencies happen, being prepared can minimize property damage and will greatly reduce the chances of serious injuries or death. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify methods of reporting emergencies. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see EAP-1.2 Emergency Action Plans for Office Employees.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.38; 29 CFR 1910.165

Emergency Response: Bomb Threats

Emergency events can happen any place, any time. Many facilities are required to have a written emergency action plan, and must train employees over that plan. These plans, however, can often be long and detailed, covering many different types of emergencies, including bomb threats. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify recommended safety measures to take during a bomb threat. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-1.2 Emergency Response.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.38

Environmental Awareness: Air Pollution

The environments we live and work in affect everything around us, and environmental issues can affect our communities for years. As we’ve learned more about how humans affect the environment, we’ve established laws, policies, and environmental practices to reduce our environmental impact and avoid repeating previous mistakes. Good environmental practices also save us money long-term by maintaining natural resources and avoiding expensive cleanup operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize signs and sources of air pollution, the effects pollution has on the environment, and how to protect their communities from environmental harm. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-1.

Environmental Awareness: Land Pollution

The environments we live and work in affect everything around us, and environmental issues can affect our communities for years. As we’ve learned more about how humans affect the environment, we’ve established laws, policies, and environmental practices to reduce our environmental impact and avoid repeating previous mistakes. Good environmental practices also save us money long-term by maintaining natural resources and avoiding expensive cleanup operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize signs and sources of land pollution, the effects pollution has on the environment, and how to protect their communities from environmental harm.

Environmental Awareness: Water Pollution

The environments we live and work in affect everything around us, and environmental issues can affect our communities for years. As we’ve learned more about how humans affect the environment, we’ve established laws, policies, and environmental practices to reduce our environmental impact and avoid repeating previous mistakes. Good environmental practices also save us money long-term by maintaining natural resources and avoiding expensive cleanup operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize signs and sources of water pollution, the effects pollution has on the environment, and how to protect their communities from environmental harm. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-1.

Excavation and Trenching Hazards

Working in and around excavations or trenches can be hazardous. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an average of 24 worker deaths and 88 injuries every year from cave-ins alone. Falls, falling loads, hazardous atmospheres and mobile excavating equipment can also create hazards for workers in trenches and excavations. Workers in excavations need to know what hazards they’ll be exposed to and how to protect themselves. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize hazards in excavations and trenches.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.650-652

Excavation and Trenching Requirements

Working in and around excavations or trenches can be hazardous. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an average of 24 worker deaths and 88 injuries every year from cave-ins alone. Falls, falling loads, hazardous atmospheres and mobile excavating equipment can also create hazards for workers in trenches and excavations. Workers in excavations need to know what hazards they’ll be exposed to and how to protect themselves. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify trenching and excavation requirements.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.650-652

Excavation and Trenching: Hazard Controls

Working in and around excavations or trenches can be hazardous. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an average of 24 worker deaths and 88 injuries every year from cave-ins alone. Falls, falling loads, hazardous atmospheres and mobile excavating equipment can also create hazards for workers in trenches and excavations. Workers in excavations need to know what hazards they’ll be exposed to and how to protect themselves. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify hazard controls in and around excavations.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.650-652

Excavation and Trenching: Roles and Responsibilities

Working in and around excavations or trenches can be hazardous. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an average of 24 worker deaths and 88 injuries every year from cave-ins alone. Falls, falling loads, hazardous atmospheres and mobile excavating equipment can also create hazards for workers in trenches and excavations. Workers in excavations need to know what hazards they’ll be exposed to and how to protect themselves. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize both employee and competent person responsibilities in excavations.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1926.650-652

Excavation Competent Person – Excavation Hazards

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in recent years cave-ins have caused an average of 24 worker fatalities and 88 injuries on U.S. worksites. Because excavation and trenching can be technically challenging and carries unique hazards, safe work requires a competent person trained to identify and mitigate these hazards. After completing this course, learners should be able to recognize the hazards of excavations. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EXC-2.2 Excavation and Trenching – Competent Person.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.650; 1926.651; 1926.32(f)

Excavation Competent Person – Preplanning Excavations

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in recent years cave-ins have caused an average of 24 worker fatalities and 88 injuries on U.S. worksites. Because excavation and trenching can be technically challenging and carries unique hazards, safe work requires a competent person trained to identify and mitigate these hazards. After completing this course, learners should be able to recognize how to preplan for an excavation. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EXC-2.2 Excavation and Trenching – Competent Person.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.650; 1926.651; 1926.32(f)

Excavation Competent Person – Protective Systems

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in recent years cave-ins have caused an average of 24 worker fatalities and 88 injuries on U.S. worksites. Because excavation and trenching can be technically challenging and carries unique hazards, safe work requires a competent person trained to identify and mitigate these hazards. After completing this course, learners should be able to identify excavation protection systems. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EXC-2.2 Excavation and Trenching – Competent Person.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.650; 1926.651; 1926.32(f)

Excavation Competent Person – Roles and Responsibilities

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in recent years cave-ins have caused an average of 24 worker fatalities and 88 injuries on U.S. worksites. Because excavation and trenching can be technically challenging and carries unique hazards, safe work requires a competent person trained to identify and mitigate these hazards. After completing this course, learners should be able to understand the roles and responsibilities of a competent person. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EXC-2.2 Excavation and Trenching – Competent Person.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.650; 1926.651; 1926.32(f)

Excavation Competent Person – Soil Classification

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in recent years cave-ins have caused an average of 24 worker fatalities and 88 injuries on U.S. worksites. Because excavation and trenching can be technically challenging and carries unique hazards, safe work requires a competent person trained to identify and mitigate these hazards. After completing this course, learners should be able to identify different types of soil in which excavations are performed. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EXC-2.2 Excavation and Trenching – Competent Person.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.650; 1926.651; 1926.32(f)

Eye Wash and Safety Shower Awareness

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires workers that could be exposed to corrosive chemicals have an eyewash or emergency shower in their work area. Eyewashes and emergency showers are used to flush corrosive chemicals out of peoples’ eyes and off affected parts of their bodies if necessary. Acting quickly after a chemical splash can help avoid serious injury, so workers need to know where those facilities are and how to use them. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify requirements for eyewash stations and emergency showers, and recognize procedures for using and maintaining eyewashes and emergency showers.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.151c; ANSI/ISEA Z258.1-2014

Fair Labor Standards Act – FLSA Basics

Employees in the United States are protected by the Fair Labor Standards Act, or FLSA. This Act requires employers to pay a fair wage for hours worked, limits hours worked without overtime pay, and regulates children working. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify basic provisions of the FLSA, including child labor provisions and exemptions. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-25.2 Fair Labor Standards Act.

Relevant Standards: The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, As Amended

Fair Labor Standards Act – Maximum Hours

Employees in the United States are protected by the Fair Labor Standards Act, or FLSA. This Act requires employers to pay a fair wage for hours worked, limits hours worked without overtime pay, and regulates children working. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify maximum hours and overtime provisions under the FLSA. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-25.2 Fair Labor Standards Act.

Relevant Standards: The Fair Labor StanThe Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, As Amended

Fair Labor Standards Act – Minimum Wage

Employees in the United States are protected by the Fair Labor Standards Act, or FLSA. This Act requires employers to pay a fair wage for hours worked, limits hours worked without overtime pay, and regulates children working. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify federal minimum wage provisions under the FLSA. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-25.2 Fair Labor Standards Act.

Relevant Standards: The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, As Amended

Fire Protection Oil and Gas: Common Fire Hazards

Most workplaces have procedures and controls to prevent fires, but fire safety needs special attention on an oil and gas site. Fires are one of the most common emergencies to contend with on oil and gas sites, and can be one of the most harmful if not dealt with properly. This course should give employees the knowledge to safely react and respond to a fire emergency in their workplace. Employees will learn to recognize common fire hazards found on oil and gas sites. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-3.2 Fire Protection for Oil and Gas Employees.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H; 1910 Subpart L; 1910 Subpart Q

Fire Protection Oil and Gas: Emergencies and Evacuation

Most workplaces have procedures and controls to prevent fires, but fire safety needs special attention on an oil and gas site. Fires are one of the most common emergencies to contend with on oil and gas sites, and can be one of the most harmful if not dealt with properly. This course should give employees the knowledge to safely react and respond to a fire emergency in their workplace. Employees will learn to identify procedures for emergency response and evacuations. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-3.2 Fire Protection for Oil and Gas Employees.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart E; 1910 Subpart H; 1910 Subpart L; 1910 Subpart Q; 29 CFR 1915 Subpart P

Fire Protection Oil and Gas: Protection and Prevention

Most workplaces have procedures and controls to prevent fires, but fire safety needs special attention on an oil and gas site. Fires are one of the most common emergencies to contend with on oil and gas sites, and can be one of the most harmful if not dealt with properly. This course should give employees the knowledge to safely react and respond to a fire emergency in their workplace. Employees will learn to identify safeguards for fire prevention and protection. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-3.2 Fire Protection for Oil and Gas Employees.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart H; 1910 Subpart L; 1910 Subpart Q

Fire Safety: Alarms

Fire emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere, in any industry. Fires are one of the most common emergencies to contend with in workplaces, and can be one of the most harmful if not dealt with properly. This course will give employees the knowledge to safely react and respond to a fire emergency in their workplace, including how to identify and react to alarm signals in their workplace. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see FRS-1.2 Fire Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.165

Fire Safety: Evacuation and Procedures

Fire emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere, in any industry. Fires are one of the most common emergencies to contend with in workplaces, and can be one of the most harmful if not dealt with properly. This course will give employees the knowledge to safely react and respond to a fire emergency in their workplace, including general information over evacuation routes and procedures in their workplace. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see FRS-1.2 Fire Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.33 – 39

Fire Safety: Fire Suppression

Fire emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere, in any industry. Fires are one of the most common emergencies to contend with in workplaces, and can be one of the most harmful if not dealt with properly. This course will give employees the knowledge to safely react and respond to a fire emergency in their workplace, including the basics of how fires work and how to use a portable fire extinguisher. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see FRS-1.2 Fire Safety and FRS-2.2 Portable Fire Extinguishers.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.37, 29 CFR 1910.39

Fire Safety: Portable Fire Extinguishers

Fires can happen anytime, anywhere, without warning. The National Fire Protection Association, or NFPA, reports that there are more than 1.3 million reported fires in the United States every year. If you encounter a fire at home or on the job, a portable fire extinguisher can help you to protect yourself and possibly stop the fire in its tracks. This course will introduce employees to portable fire extinguishers, how they work and when to use them. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see FRS-2.2 Portable Fire Extinguishers.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.157

Forklift Operator Training – Module 1 – Safe Operations

This module contains the lesson on safe forklift operations from the SafetySkills Forklift Operator Training course. This information is available as a stand-alone module for employees who only need targeted training over safe operations at this time. This module is presented in English, Spanish, Portuguese, German and Mandarin.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.178(m)(1-14)

Forklift Operator Training – Module 2 – Safe Traveling and Loading

This module contains the lesson on safe traveling and loading from the SafetySkills Forklift Operator Training course. This information is available as a stand-alone module for employees who only need targeted training over safe traveling and loading at this time. This module is presented in English, Spanish, Portuguese, German and Mandarin.

Relevant Standards: OSH Act 5(a)(1) General Duty Clause, 29 CFR 1910.178(n)(1) and 29 CFR 1910.178 (o)(1)

Forklift Operator Training – Module 3 – Safe Maintenance

This module contains the lesson on safe forklift maintenance from the SafetySkills Forklift Operator Training course. This information is available as a stand-alone module for employees who only need targeted training over safe maintenance at this time. This module is presented in English, Spanish, Portuguese, German and Mandarin.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.178(p)(1-5) and 29 CFR 1910.178(q)(1-10)

H2S Safety for Oil and Gas – API Site Classification

Hydrogen sulfide gas, or H2S, is a common hazard in the oil and gas industry. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize American Petroleum Institute site classifications for hydrogen sulfide hazards. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-1.2 H2S Safety for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-2; OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1); ANSI z390.1

H2S Safety for Oil and Gas – Emergency Response

Hydrogen sulfide gas, or H2S, is a common hazard in the oil and gas industry. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify emergency response procedures relating to hydrogen sulfide. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-1.2 H2S Safety for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-2; OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1); ANSI z390.1

H2S Safety for Oil and Gas – H2S Basics

Hydrogen sulfide gas, or H2S, is a common hazard in the oil and gas industry. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize basics of hydrogen sulfide, including its characteristics, sources and applicable regulations. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-1.2 H2S Safety for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-2; OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1); ANSI z390.1

H2S Safety for Oil and Gas – H2S Hazard Controls

Hydrogen sulfide gas, or H2S, is a common hazard in the oil and gas industry. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize controls to minimize exposure to hydrogen sulfide. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-1.2 H2S Safety for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-2; OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1); ANSI z390.1

H2S Safety for Oil and Gas – Other H2S Hazards

Hydrogen sulfide gas, or H2S, is a common hazard in the oil and gas industry. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify additional hazards of hydrogen sulfide. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-1.2 H2S Safety for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-2; OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1); ANSI z390.1

H2S Safety for Oil and Gas – Toxicity Hazards

Hydrogen sulfide gas, or H2S, is a common hazard in the oil and gas industry. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify toxicity hazards of hydrogen sulfide. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-1.2 H2S Safety for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-2; OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1); ANSI z390.1

H2S Safety for Oil and Gas – Training and PPE

Hydrogen sulfide gas, or H2S, is a common hazard in the oil and gas industry. Employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize training and PPE requirements for working around hydrogen sulfide. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-1.2 H2S Safety for Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-2; OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1); ANSI z390.1

Hand and Pinch Point Safety: Hand and Arm Hazards

While on the job, using a tool improperly or not paying attention while working around heavy machinery can lead to damaging various parts of a worker’s hands. Because of the complexity of the hand, repairing the hand to its previous abilities may be difficult. While most serious hand injuries occur as a result of physical trauma from machinery, other hand injuries can be caused by ergonomic hazards due to repetitive motion. While these injuries are less severe, they result in the most days away from work compared to other injuries. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of how to identify major types of hand and arm hazards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-2.2 Hand and Pinch Point Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.138 Hand Protection

Hand and Pinch Point Safety: Methods of Protection

While on the job, using a tool improperly or not paying attention while working around heavy machinery can lead to damaging various parts of a worker’s hands. Because of the complexity of the hand, repairing the hand to its previous abilities may be difficult. While most serious hand injuries occur as a result of physical trauma from machinery, other hand injuries can be caused by ergonomic hazards due to repetitive motion. While these injuries are less severe, they result in the most days away from work compared to other injuries. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of how to identify methods of hand and arm protection. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-2.2 Hand and Pinch Point Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.138 Hand Protection

Hand and Pinch Point Safety: Pinch Point Hazards

While on the job, using a tool improperly or not paying attention while working around heavy machinery can lead to damaging various parts of a worker’s hands. Because of the complexity of the hand, repairing the hand to its previous abilities may be difficult. While most serious hand injuries occur as a result of physical trauma from machinery, other hand injuries can be caused by ergonomic hazards due to repetitive motion. While these injuries are less severe, they result in the most days away from work compared to other injuries. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of how to identify types of pinch point hazards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-2.2 Hand and Pinch Point Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.138 Hand Protection

Hand and Pinch Point Safety: Types of Gloves

While on the job, using a tool improperly or not paying attention while working around heavy machinery can lead to damaging various parts of a worker’s hands. Because of the complexity of the hand, repairing the hand to its previous abilities may be difficult. While most serious hand injuries occur as a result of physical trauma from machinery, other hand injuries can be caused by ergonomic hazards due to repetitive motion. While these injuries are less severe, they result in the most days away from work compared to other injuries. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of how to recognize types of gloves and when to use them. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-2.2 Hand and Pinch Point Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.138 Hand Protection

Hands-Only CPR

If a person’s heart and/or breathing stops, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR, can keep that person alive until emergency medical help arrives. CPR keeps a person’s blood oxygenated and flowing. Anyone can perform CPR, which generally includes performing chest compressions and/or mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. However, some people may be uncomfortable performing mouth-to-mouth. In 2008, the American Heart Association established new guidelines for hands-only CPR. This was based on new scientific studies, but also as a way to get bystanders to feel empowered to help if someone collapses. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the recommended steps for performing hands-only CPR.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.151

Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in New York – Forms of Discrimination and Harassment

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Supervisory employees who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize common forms of discrimination and harassment. This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-23.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in New York.

Relevant Standards: New York State Human Rights Law; NYC Local Law 96; The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act;

Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in New York – Types of Discrimination

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Supervisory employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the definitions of different types of discrimination. This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-23.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in New York.

Relevant Standards: New York State Human Rights Law; NYC Local Law 96; The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act;

Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in New York – Victim Rights/Employer Responsibilities

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Supervisory employees who successfully complete this course should be able to identify victim rights and employer responsibilities following a harassment or discrimination incident. This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-23.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in New York.

Relevant Standards: New York State Human Rights Law; NYC Local Law 96; The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act;

Hazard Communication: Chemical Hazards and Hazard Controls

Chemicals can pose a wide range of health and physical hazards, and exposure to hazardous chemicals is common for workers in a large variety of industries. When workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals, OSHA requires employers to provide employees with information about those hazards and training over how to protect themselves and others from harm. During this course, employees will learn about OSHA’s Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard and the methods for learning about chemical hazards and their controls. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-1.2 Hazard Communication.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1200, the Hazard Communication Standard (OSHA)

Hazard Communication: Labels

Chemicals can pose a wide range of health and physical hazards, and exposure to hazardous chemicals is common for workers in a large variety of industries. When workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals, OSHA requires employers to provide employees with information about those hazards and training over how to protect themselves and others from harm. During this course, employees will learn about labeling requirements under OSHA’s Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-1.2 Hazard Communication.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1200, the Hazard Communication Standard (OSHA)

Hazard Communication: Medical Recordkeeping

When workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals, OSHA requires employers to provide employees with information about those hazards and training over how to protect themselves and others from harm. During this course, employees will learn about medical recordkeeping requirements under OSHA’s Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-1.2 Hazard Communication.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1200, the Hazard Communication Standard (OSHA)

Hazard Communication: Purpose and Requirements of a HAZCOM Program

Chemicals can pose a wide range of health and physical hazards, and exposure to hazardous chemicals is common for workers in a large variety of industries. When workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals, OSHA requires employers to provide employees with information about those hazards and training over how to protect themselves and others from harm. During this course, employees will learn about OSHA’s Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard and the purpose of a HAZCOM program. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-1.2 Hazard Communication.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1200, the Hazard Communication Standard (OSHA)

Hazard Communication: Safety Data Sheet Awareness

Chemicals can pose a wide range of health and physical hazards, and exposure to hazardous chemicals is common for workers in a large variety of industries. When workers are exposed to hazardous chemicals, OSHA requires employers to provide employees with information about those hazards and training over how to protect themselves and others from harm. During this course, employees will learn about OSHA’s Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) standard and using safety data sheets (SDSs) to determine chemical hazards in their workplace. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-1.2 Hazard Communication.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1200, the Hazard Communication Standard (OSHA)

Hazard Communication: SDS Sections

A safety data sheet, or SDS, provides employees with information about hazardous chemicals. SDSs must follow a standard format, and will always present certain information that workers and emergency responders need. This course is intended to help employees understand what information is presented in the SDS and where to find it. After successfully completing the course, learners should be able to identify the key components of a safety data sheet, including the 16 sections required by the Globally Harmonized System (GHS), an international system of rules for classifying and labeling chemicals. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MSD-1.2 Safety Data Sheets.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1200

Hazardous Driving Conditions: Driving in Severe Weather

Driving can be dangerous any time, but hazardous road and weather conditions can greatly increase the chances of accidents. Statistically, driving accidents occur at highly elevated rates during hazardous weather conditions, such as snow, sleet, ice, rain and fog. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify methods for eliminating, minimizing or avoiding those hazards while driving on public roads. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-6.2 Hazardous Driving Conditions.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Hazardous Driving Conditions: Preparing Your Vehicle

Driving can be dangerous any time, but hazardous road and weather conditions can greatly increase the chances of accidents. Statistically, driving accidents occur at highly elevated rates during hazardous weather conditions, such as snow, sleet, ice, rain and fog. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize preparations to take before driving a vehicle in hazardous weather conditions. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-6.2 Hazardous Driving Conditions.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Hazardous Driving Conditions: Severe Weather Conditions

Driving can be dangerous any time, but hazardous road and weather conditions can greatly increase the chances of accidents. Statistically, driving accidents occur at highly elevated rates during hazardous weather conditions, such as snow, sleet, ice, rain and fog. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify hazardous driving conditions. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-6.2 Hazardous Driving Conditions.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Hazards of Speeding – Canada

Someone dies in a motor vehicle accident about once every twelve minutes. It is estimated that speeding is a factor in over 30 percent of those traffic fatalities, which translates to 10,000 -13,000 deaths a year. Learners that successfully complete this course will demonstrate the ability to recognize speeding hazards and identify strategies to minimize, eliminate or avoid them. This course is designed for employees in Canada in all industries who, during the course of their regular job duties, will operate a motor vehicle on public roadways. Employers may also be interested in these related courses: Basic Driver Safety, Distracted Driver, Road Rage, Delivery Driver Safety, and Hazardous Driving Conditions.

Relevant Standards: General duty clauses of provincial, territorial and federal OHS acts

Hazards of Speeding

Someone dies in a motor vehicle accident about once every twelve minutes. It is estimated that speeding is a factor in over 30 percent of those traffic fatalities, which translates to 10,000 -13,000 deaths a year. Learners that successfully complete this course will demonstrate the ability to recognize speeding hazards and identify strategies to minimize, eliminate or avoid them. This course is designed for employees in all industries who, during the course of their regular job duties, will operate a motor vehicle on public roadways. Employers may also be interested in these related courses: Basic Driver Safety, Distracted Driver, Road Rage, Delivery Driver Safety, and Hazardous Driving Conditions.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Hearing Conservation Oil and Gas: Hearing Protection

The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, or NIOSH, estimates that 76% of all oil and gas extraction workers are exposed to hazardous levels of noise. NIOSH also estimates that 25% of noise-exposed workers have trouble understanding speech, and an additional 11% of workers experience tinnitus. Hearing loss usually happens slowly, over time, so it’s important for workers to consistently protect their hearing on the job. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify hearing protection controls on oil and gas sites. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-11.2 Hearing Conservation for Oil and Gas Workers.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.95; 29 CFR 1926.52; 29 CFR 1926.101

Hearing Conservation Oil and Gas: Noise Impacts

The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, or NIOSH, estimates that 76% of all oil and gas extraction workers are exposed to hazardous levels of noise. NIOSH also estimates that 25% of noise-exposed workers have trouble understanding speech, and an additional 11% of workers experience tinnitus. Hearing loss usually happens slowly, over time, so it’s important for workers to consistently protect their hearing on the job. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize how sound and noise can impact their hearing. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-11.2 Hearing Conservation for Oil and Gas Workers.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.95; 29 CFR 1926.52; 29 CFR 1926.101

Hearing Conservation Oil and Gas: Noise Monitoring

The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, or NIOSH, estimates that 76% of all oil and gas extraction workers are exposed to hazardous levels of noise. NIOSH also estimates that 25% of noise-exposed workers have trouble understanding speech, and an additional 11% of workers experience tinnitus. Hearing loss usually happens slowly, over time, so it’s important for workers to consistently protect their hearing on the job. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safe practices for hearing conservation and audiometric testing. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-11.2 Hearing Conservation for Oil and Gas Workers.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.95; 29 CFR 1926.52; 29 CFR 1926.101

Hearing Conservation: Noise Monitoring and Testing

Hearing loss is a major hazard in many workplaces. Approximately 30 million American workers are exposed to noise levels at their job that can damage their hearing, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that over 20,000 employees report occupationally-induced hearing loss every year. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to identify safe practices for noise monitoring and audiometric testing. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRC-1.2 Hearing Conservation.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.95; 29 CFR 1926.52

Hearing Conservation: Sound and Noise Basics

Hearing loss is a major hazard in many workplaces. Approximately 30 million American workers are exposed to noise levels at their job that can damage their hearing, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that over 20,000 employees report occupationally-induced hearing loss every year. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to identify how sound and noises can impact their hearing. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRC-1.2 Hearing Conservation.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.95; 29 CFR 1926.52

Hearing Conservation: Types of Hearing Protection

Hearing loss is a major hazard in many workplaces. Approximately 30 million American workers are exposed to noise levels at their job that can damage their hearing, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that over 20,000 employees report occupationally-induced hearing loss every year. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to identify types of hearing protection and other controls to protect their hearing. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRC-1.2 Hearing Conservation.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.95; 29 CFR 1926.52

Hot Work/Arc Welding: Additional Hazards of Hot Work

Hot work is any work that produces fire or sparks, including welding, flame cutting, soldering, and brazing. Welding and other forms of hot work can pose a serious health hazard to workers, but training, safe practices and hazard controls can help workers keep themselves safe. This course should help employees identify additional hazards associated with hot work. This course is intended for employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is available in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HTW-1.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.251-254

Hot Work/Arc Welding: Employee Responsibilities for Hot Work

Hot work is any work that produces fire or sparks, including welding, flame cutting, soldering, and brazing. Welding and other forms of hot work can pose a serious health hazard to workers, but training, safe practices and hazard controls can help workers keep themselves safe. This course should help employees identify employee roles and responsibilities for hot work. This course is intended for employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is available in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HTW-1.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.251-254

Hot Work/Arc Welding: Hot Work Hazard Controls

Hot work is any work that produces fire or sparks, including welding, flame cutting, soldering, and brazing. Welding and other forms of hot work can pose a serious health hazard to workers, but training, safe practices and hazard controls can help workers keep themselves safe. This course should help employees identify hazard controls for performing hot work. This course is intended for employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is available in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HTW-1.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.251-254

Hot Work/Arc Welding: Hot Work Hazard Controls

Hot work is any work that produces fire or sparks, including welding, flame cutting, soldering, and brazing. Welding and other forms of hot work can pose a serious health hazard to workers, but training, safe practices and hazard controls can help workers keep themselves safe. This course should help employees identify hazard controls for performing hot work. This course is intended for employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is available in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HTW-1.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.251-254

Hot Work/Arc Welding: Hot Work Hazards

Hot work is any work that produces fire or sparks, including welding, flame cutting, soldering, and brazing. Welding and other forms of hot work can pose a serious health hazard to workers, but training, safe practices and hazard controls can help workers keep themselves safe. This course should help employees identify hazards specific to hot work. This course is intended for employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is available in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HTW-1.2.

Relevant Standards: OSOSHA 29 CFR 1910.251-254

Hot Work/Arc Welding: Types and Hazards of Hot Work

Hot work is any work that produces fire or sparks, including welding, flame cutting, soldering, and brazing. Welding and other forms of hot work can pose a serious health hazard to workers, but training, safe practices and hazard controls can help workers keep themselves safe. This course should help employees identify types of hot work and their hazards. This course is intended for employees who perform hot work, including welding, brazing and torch cutting, as part of their regular work duties. While this course addresses OSHA training requirements, there may be a site-specific training component required that must be fulfilled by an employer. This course is available in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HTW-1.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.251-254

Housekeeping Awareness

Housekeeping is important for both indoor and outdoor storage. Whether working indoors or outdoors, it’s important for employees to keep their work area clean and free of debris and obstructions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize housekeeping best practices, including requirements for indoor and outdoor surfaces and waste management. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see STF-1.2 Slips, Trips, and Falls and MAT-1.2 Materials Handling.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910 Subpart D; 29 CFR 1910.176; 29 CFR 1910.22; 29 CFR 1910.37; 29 CFR 1910.132; 29 CFR 1910.133; 29 CFR 1910.135; 29 CFR 1910.136; 29 CFR 1910.138; 29 CFR 1910.178; 29 CFR 1926.250; 29 CFR 1926.252

Human Trafficking Awareness – Human Trafficking Basics

Human trafficking is a complex global industry. It is worth $150 billion, profiting from approximately 25 million individuals. Although human trafficking can happen anywhere, hotels, motels and other short-term accommodations are often used by traffickers. When employees have completed this microlearning course, they should be able to identify the definitions of human trafficking and commercial exploitation of children, as well as characteristics of both possible victims and traffickers. This is a sensitive subject and this material may be emotionally difficult for some learners. Supervisors should speak with their employees and offer access to the Employee Assistance Program, or EAP. For a broader training experience over this topic, see HSP-13.2 Human Trafficking Awareness and Prevention.

Relevant Standards: California Senate Bill No. 970, The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000

Human Trafficking Awareness – Human Trafficking Signs

Human trafficking is a complex global industry. It is worth $150 billion, profiting from approximately 25 million individuals. Although human trafficking can happen anywhere, hotels, motels and other short-term accommodations are often used by traffickers. When employees have completed this microlearning course, they should be able to identify signs that hotel workers can use to identify potential trafficking. This is a sensitive subject and this material may be emotionally difficult for some learners. Supervisors should speak with their employees and offer access to the Employee Assistance Program, or EAP. For a broader training experience over this topic, see HSP-13.2 Human Trafficking Awareness and Prevention.

Relevant Standards: California Senate Bill No. 970, The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000

Human Trafficking Awareness – Preventing Trafficking

Human trafficking is a complex global industry. It is worth $150 billion, profiting from approximately 25 million individuals. Although human trafficking can happen anywhere, hotels, motels and other short-term accommodations are often used by traffickers. When employees have completed this microlearning course, they should be able to identify methods hotels can use to prevent trafficking, as well as how to get assistance if they suspect trafficking is occurring. This is a sensitive subject and this material may be emotionally difficult for some learners. Supervisors should speak with their employees and offer access to the Employee Assistance Program, or EAP. For a broader training experience over this topic, see HSP-13.2 Human Trafficking Awareness and Prevention.

Relevant Standards: California Senate Bill No. 970, The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000

Human Trafficking Awareness – Trafficking in Hotels

Human trafficking is a complex global industry. It is worth $150 billion, profiting from approximately 25 million individuals. Although human trafficking can happen anywhere, hotels, motels and other short-term accommodations are often used by traffickers. When employees have completed this microlearning course, they should be able to identify where trafficking commonly occurs, as well as the types of trafficking that occur in hotels. This is a sensitive subject and this material may be emotionally difficult for some learners. Supervisors should speak with their employees and offer access to the Employee Assistance Program, or EAP. For a broader training experience over this topic, see HSP-13.2 Human Trafficking Awareness and Prevention.

Relevant Standards: California Senate Bill No. 970, The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000

Hurricane Safety: Hurricane Risk Areas

Hurricanes and tropical storms are disruptive, dangerous events that can wreak havoc on entire regions. These storms can bring torrential rain, flooding, high winds and even tornadoes when they make landfall or move along the coast. They can also uproot trees, bring down power lines, damage or destroy buildings and infrastructure, and cause significant loss of life. Even a well-funded cleanup effort can take months or years. Fortunately, meteorologists can track hurricanes and forecast their expected path, giving the public several days to prepare before landfall. However, people have a much better chance of protecting themselves and their property if they have evacuation plans and supplies ready before a hurricane becomes a threat to their area. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize preparations to take in hurricane risk areas. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-3.2 Hurricane Safety.

Hurricane Safety: Preparing for a Hurricane

Hurricanes and tropical storms are disruptive, dangerous events that can wreak havoc on entire regions. These storms can bring torrential rain, flooding, high winds and even tornadoes when they make landfall or move along the coast. They can also uproot trees, bring down power lines, damage or destroy buildings and infrastructure, and cause significant loss of life. Even a well-funded cleanup effort can take months or years. Fortunately, meteorologists can track hurricanes and forecast their expected path, giving the public several days to prepare before landfall. However, people have a much better chance of protecting themselves and their property if they have evacuation plans and supplies ready before a hurricane becomes a threat to their area. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify preparations to take before a hurricane arrives. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-3.2 Hurricane Safety.

Hurricane Safety: Safety During and After a Hurricane

Hurricanes and tropical storms are disruptive, dangerous events that can wreak havoc on entire regions. These storms can bring torrential rain, flooding, high winds and even tornadoes when they make landfall or move along the coast. They can also uproot trees, bring down power lines, damage or destroy buildings and infrastructure, and cause significant loss of life. Even a well-funded cleanup effort can take months or years. Fortunately, meteorologists can track hurricanes and forecast their expected path, giving the public several days to prepare before landfall. However, people have a much better chance of protecting themselves and their property if they have evacuation plans and supplies ready before a hurricane becomes a threat to their area. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safety measures to take during and after a hurricane. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see EMR-3.2 Hurricane Safety.

Incident Investigation Canada: Aspects of Investigations

In a perfect world, there would be no workplace accidents. Unfortunately in the real world injuries, property damage, work disruption and near miss incidents will happen from time to time. When they do, it is important to have a procedure in place to determine what happened, how and why it happened, and how to prevent it from happening again. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify aspects of an incident investigation. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see INV-1.2can Incident Investigation – Canada.

Incident Investigation Canada: Investigation Steps

In a perfect world, there would be no workplace accidents. Unfortunately in the real world injuries, property damage, work disruption and near miss incidents will happen from time to time. When they do, it is important to have a procedure in place to determine what happened, how and why it happened, and how to prevent it from happening again. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify general steps of an incident investigation. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see INV-1.2can Incident Investigation – Canada.

Incident Investigation Canada: Roles and Terms

In a perfect world, there would be no workplace accidents. Unfortunately in the real world injuries, property damage, work disruption and near miss incidents will happen from time to time. When they do, it is important to have a procedure in place to determine what happened, how and why it happened, and how to prevent it from happening again. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify situations and individuals involved in incident investigations. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see INV-1.2can Incident Investigation – Canada.

Incident Investigation: Aspects of Investigations

In a perfect world, there would be no workplace accidents. Unfortunately in the real world injuries, property damage, work disruption and near miss incidents will happen from time to time. When they do, it is important to have a procedure in place to determine what happened, how and why it happened, and how to prevent it from happening again. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify aspects of an incident investigation. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see INV-1.2 Incident Investigation.

Relevant Standards: Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970, Section 5(a)(1), General Duty Clause

Incident Investigation: Investigation Steps

In a perfect world, there would be no workplace accidents. Unfortunately in the real world injuries, property damage, work disruption and near miss incidents will happen from time to time. When they do, it is important to have a procedure in place to determine what happened, how and why it happened, and how to prevent it from happening again. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify general steps of an incident investigation. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see INV-1.2 Incident Investigation.

Relevant Standards: Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970, Section 5(a)(1), General Duty Clause

Incident Investigation: Roles and Terms

In a perfect world, there would be no workplace accidents. Unfortunately in the real world injuries, property damage, work disruption and near miss incidents will happen from time to time. When they do, it is important to have a procedure in place to determine what happened, how and why it happened, and how to prevent it from happening again. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify situations and individuals involved in incident investigations. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see INV-1.2 Incident Investigation.

Relevant Standards: Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970, Section 5(a)(1), General DuOccupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970, Section 5(a)(1), General Duty Clause

Industrial Ergonomics: Back Injury Prevention

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to use ergonomics in industrial settings to reduce injury. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common types of back injury prevention measures. For a more complete training experience over this topic, see ERG-1.2 Industrial Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Industrial Ergonomics: Musculoskeletal Disorders

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to use ergonomics in industrial settings to reduce injury. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize common musculoskeletal disorders and measures to prevent them. For a more complete training experience over this topic, see ERG-1.2 Industrial Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: OSHA GenerOSHA General Duty Clause

Industrial Ergonomics: Risk Factors

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to use ergonomics in industrial settings to reduce injury. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize ergonomic risk factors. For a more complete training experience over this topic, see ERG-1.2 Industrial Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Influenza Prevention

Flu season is usually a cause for concern for most people. However, as new flu strains surface every year and the risk of pandemic flu has become a more public issue and prominent health concern, people have become more concerned than they might usually be. Because most people are exposed to so many other people on the job, workplaces can easily be a point of spread for the flu if the proper precautions aren’t taken. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the means by which influenza is spread and recommended measures to prevent its spread.

Influenza Symptoms and Prevention Strategies for Employees and Business Owners

Flu outbreaks happen every year, killing hundreds of thousands worldwide. Most healthy adults’ immune systems can fight off a normal flu bug, but it is important to know what precautions to take to help keep an epidemic or pandemic from spreading. This course is designed to give employees, managers and other interested parties basic information about influenza viruses. The course covers the basics of flu infection, its spreading mechanisms and infection prevention strategies. The course also addresses current concerns about the H1N1 (swine) flu with up-to-date information from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization.

Job Hazard Analysis Canada: Correcting and Preventing Hazards

Physical hazards are an inherent part of every job, though some jobs might present more serious risks than others. Job hazard analysis can help employees discover hazards in their workplaces and protect themselves from them. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify strategies to correct and prevent workplace hazards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see JSA-1.2can Job Hazard Analysis – Canada.

Job Hazard Analysis Canada: JHA Steps

Physical hazards are an inherent part of every job, though some jobs might present more serious risks than others. Job hazard analysis can help employees discover hazards in their workplaces and protect themselves from them. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the purpose and steps of a job hazard analysis. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see JSA-1.2can Job Hazard Analysis – Canada.

Job Hazard Analysis: Correcting and Preventing Hazards

Physical hazards are an inherent part of every job, though some jobs might present more serious risks than others. Job hazard analysis can help employees discover hazards in their workplaces and protect themselves from them. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify strategies to correct and prevent workplace hazards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see JSA-1.2 Job Hazard Analysis.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Job Hazard Analysis: JHA Steps

Physical hazards are an inherent part of every job, though some jobs might present more serious risks than others. Job hazard analysis can help employees discover hazards in their workplaces and protect themselves from them. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the purpose and steps of a job hazard analysis. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see JSA-1.2 Job Hazard Analysis.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Ladder Safety: Inspection and Set-up

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize the importance of ladder inspection, set-up and location. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see LDR-1.2 Ladder Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.24 – 27

Ladder Safety: Safe Use

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to identify the best practices for safe ladder use. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see LDR-1.2 Ladder Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.24 – 27

Ladder Safety: Types and General Safe Practices

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to identify types of ladders and general safe practices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see LDR-1.2 Ladder Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.24 – 27

Lead Awareness: Exposure Monitoring and Medical Response

Lead has been used for thousands of years. However, accidental exposure to and consumption of lead is poisonous and can result in significant organ and tissue damage. This course will teach employees about exposure monitoring and the medical response to lead poisoning. This course is intended for general-industry employees who may be exposed to significant levels of lead, and can assist employers in meeting OSHA’s requirements on lead exposure. This course is presented in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PBA-1.2 Lead Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1025

Lead Awareness: Health Effects and Routes of Exposure

Lead has been used for thousands of years. However, accidental exposure to and consumption of lead is poisonous and can result in significant organ and tissue damage. This course will teach employees about the hazards of lead exposure. This course is intended for general-industry employees who may be exposed to significant levels of lead, and can assist employers in meeting OSHA’s requirements on lead exposure. This course is presented in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PBA-1.2 Lead Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1025

Lead Awareness: Mitigating Lead Hazards

Lead has been used for thousands of years. However, accidental exposure to and consumption of lead is poisonous and can result in significant organ and tissue damage. This course will teach employees about methods for mitigating lead hazards. This course is intended for general-industry employees who may be exposed to significant levels of lead, and can assist employers in meeting OSHA’s requirements on lead exposure. This course is presented in English. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PBA-1.2 Lead Awareness.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1025

Machine Guarding Canada: Common Machine Guards

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify common types of machine guards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2can Machine Guarding – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Machine guarding requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations.

Machine Guarding Canada: Guarding Considerations

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify employee and employer considerations when working with machine guards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2can Machine Guarding – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Machine guarding requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations.

Machine Guarding Canada: Machine Hazards

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify hazards associated with machine parts and motions. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2can Machine Guarding – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Machine guarding requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations.

Machine Guarding Canada: Safeguarding Devices

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify types of safeguarding devices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2can Machine Guarding – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Machine guarding requirements under provincial, territorial and federal OHS regulations.

Machine Guarding: Common Machine Guards

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify common types of machine guards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2 Machine Guarding.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart O 211-219

Machine Guarding: Guarding Considerations

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify employee and employer considerations when working with machine guards. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2 Machine Guarding.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart O 211-219

Machine Guarding: Machine Hazards

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify hazards associated with machine parts and motions. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2 Machine Guarding.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart O 211-219

Machine Guarding: Safeguarding Devices

Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Employees who successfully complete this course will be able to identify types of safeguarding devices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MCG-1.2 Machine Guarding.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910 SOSHA 29 CFR 1910 Subpart O 211-219

Marine Trash and Debris – Importance of Prevention

Any items that are brought to an offshore oil and gas rig can fall into the water below if they’re not properly secured or disposed of. Once in the water, currents can move trash and debris around the ocean, where it can harm fish and other aquatic life, as well as affect other economic activity dependent on the ocean. Any person or company that creates marine trash and debris, whether intentional or by accident, can be subject to legal action, so offshore oil and gas workers need to know their responsibilities for preventing marine trash and debris. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the importance of trash and debris prevention. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-58.2 Marine Trash and Debris.

Relevant Standards: 30 CFR 250 Subparts C & Q; BSEE NTL 2015-G03

Marine Trash and Debris – Prevention Requirements

Any items that are brought to an offshore oil and gas rig can fall into the water below if they’re not properly secured or disposed of. Once in the water, currents can move trash and debris around the ocean, where it can harm fish and other aquatic life, as well as affect other economic activity dependent on the ocean. Any person or company that creates marine trash and debris, whether intentional or by accident, can be subject to legal action, so offshore oil and gas workers need to know their responsibilities for preventing marine trash and debris. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify requirements for marine trash and debris prevention. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-58.2 Marine Trash and Debris.

Relevant Standards: 30 CFR 250 Subparts C & Q; BSEE NTL 20130 CFR 250 Subparts C & Q; BSEE NTL 2015-G03

Marine Trash and Debris – Recommended Practices

Any items that are brought to an offshore oil and gas rig can fall into the water below if they’re not properly secured or disposed of. Once in the water, currents can move trash and debris around the ocean, where it can harm fish and other aquatic life, as well as affect other economic activity dependent on the ocean. Any person or company that creates marine trash and debris, whether intentional or by accident, can be subject to legal action, so offshore oil and gas workers need to know their responsibilities for preventing marine trash and debris. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify best practices for marine trash and debris prevention. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-58.2 Marine Trash and Debris.

Relevant Standards: 30 CFR 250 Subparts C & Q; BSEE NTL 2015-G03

Materials Handling: Housekeeping Practices

Materials handling and storage covers a wide range of activities, from something simple like moving a few boxes from a closet to a storage area to something as complicated as hauling tons of steel with a crane. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize best practices for storage and housekeeping best practices, including waste management. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MAT-1.2 Materials Handling.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176; 29 CFR 1910.22; 29 CFR 1926.250; 29 CFR 1926.252

Materials Handling: Safe Lifting

Materials handling and storage covers a wide range of activities, from something simple like moving a few boxes from a closet to a storage area to something as complicated as hauling tons of steel with a crane. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the hazards of lifting and how to safely execute a lift. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MAT-1.2 Materials Handling.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176; 29 CFR 1910.132; 29 CFR 1910.178

Materials Handling: Safe Unloading

Materials handling and storage covers a wide range of activities, from something simple like moving a few boxes from a closet to a storage area to something as complicated as hauling tons of steel with a crane. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize safe practices for unloading. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MAT-1.2 Materials Handling.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176; 29 CFR 1910.22; 29 CFR 1910.132; 29 CFR 1910.178

Materials Handling: Storage Practices

Materials handling and storage covers a wide range of activities, from something simple like moving a few boxes from a closet to a storage area to something as complicated as hauling tons of steel with a crane. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize best practices for storage and housekeeping best practices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see MAT-1.2 Materials Handling.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176; 29 CFR 1910.37; 29 CFR 1926.250

Negotiation Skills – Best Practices

Life is full of negotiations. Whether you realize it or not, we are all constantly negotiating with each other to ensure our needs are met, and to achieve our ideal outcomes. While you can’t guarantee an ideal outcome in every negotiation, there are tools and methods that you can apply to help you get as close as possible. After taking this course, employees should be able to identify some common negotiation best practices. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see SFT-2.2 Negotiation Skills.

Negotiation Skills – Negotiation Basics

Life is full of negotiations. Whether you realize it or not, we are all constantly negotiating with each other to ensure our needs are met, and to achieve our ideal outcomes. While you can’t guarantee an ideal outcome in every negotiation, there are tools and methods that you can apply to help you get as close as possible. After taking this course, employees should be able to identify the definition of negotiation, as well as the benefits of negotiation. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see SFT-2.2 Negotiation Skills.

NORM Awareness: Characteristics and Effects

Most of us are exposed to low levels of natural and man-made radiation every day. On an oil and gas site, workers can be exposed to higher levels of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). NORM can build up in pipelines and on equipment, and high concentrations can pose a significant health hazard when they aren’t properly managed. NORM can be enhanced by human activity such as oil and gas extraction. This type of NORM is known as technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM), and can increase workers’ potential for exposure. Fortunately, most workers are in little danger when they take the right precautions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize characteristics and effects of radiation and NORM. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-24.2 NORM Awareness in the Oil and Gas Industry.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1096; 29 CFR 1926.53

NORM Awareness: Controls to Minimize Exposure

Most of us are exposed to low levels of natural and man-made radiation every day. On an oil and gas site, workers can be exposed to higher levels of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). NORM can build up in pipelines and on equipment, and high concentrations can pose a significant health hazard when they aren’t properly managed. NORM can be enhanced by human activity such as oil and gas extraction. This type of NORM is known as technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM), and can increase workers’ potential for exposure. Fortunately, most workers are in little danger when they take the right precautions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify worker protections from NORM on oil and gas sites. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-24.2 NORM Awareness in the Oil and Gas Industry.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1096; 29 CFR 1926.5329 CFR 1910.1096; 29 CFR 1926.53

NORM Awareness: Sources and Handling Procedures

Most of us are exposed to low levels of natural and man-made radiation every day. On an oil and gas site, workers can be exposed to higher levels of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). NORM can build up in pipelines and on equipment, and high concentrations can pose a significant health hazard when they aren’t properly managed. NORM can be enhanced by human activity such as oil and gas extraction. This type of NORM is known as technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM), and can increase workers’ potential for exposure. Fortunately, most workers are in little danger when they take the right precautions. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize NORM sources and handling procedures. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-24.2 NORM Awareness in the Oil and Gas Industry.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1096; 29 CFR 1926.53

Office Ergonomics Canada: Body Positioning

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify recommended practices for body positioning. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2can Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: Federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Office Ergonomics Canada: Ergonomic Controls

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common ergonomic controls and equipment in office environments. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2can Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: Federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Office Ergonomics Canada: Risk Factors and Injuries

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common ergonomic risk factors and injuries in office environments. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2can Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: Federal, provincial and Federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Office Ergonomics Canada: Safe Lifting Procedures

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safe lifting procedures. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2can Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: Federal, provincial and territorial OHS regulations

Office Ergonomics: Body Positioning

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify recommended practices for body positioning. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2 Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Office Ergonomics: Ergonomic Controls

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common ergonomic controls and equipment in office environments. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2 Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Office Ergonomics: Risk Factors and Injuries

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common ergonomic risk factors and injuries in office environments. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2 Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Office Ergonomics: Safe Lifting Procedures

Ergonomics is the process of reducing worker injury through effective workplace design, such as decreasing the amount of bending or reaching for items, or using equipment to reduce the strain on the human body. This microlearning course will help teach employees how to implement ergonomic principles in office settings in order to minimize or eliminate potential hazards. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safe lifting procedures. For a more complete training experience over the broader topic, see ERG-2.2 Office Ergonomics.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Office Safety: Environmental and Fire Hazards

Office work is generally considered a pretty safe occupation, out of the elements and with relatively few hazards. However, there are certainly hazards in offices that people may not think about on a regular basis. Poor air quality, ineffective lighting and noise, slips, trips and falls, fire hazards, electrical equipment, poor workstation arrangement and improper lifting and storage are all potential safety hazards that can even be found in an office environment. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common environmental and fire hazards in offices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BOS-1.2 Office Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Office Safety: Ergonomic Hazards

Office work is generally considered a pretty safe occupation, out of the elements and with relatively few hazards. However, there are certainly hazards in offices that people may not think about on a regular basis. Poor air quality, ineffective lighting and noise, slips, trips and falls, fire hazards, electrical equipment, poor workstation arrangement and improper lifting and storage are all potential safety hazards that can even be found in an office environment. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common ergonomic hazards in offices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BOS-1.2 Office Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Office Safety: Fall Prevention and Safe Lifting

Office work is generally considered a pretty safe occupation, out of the elements and with relatively few hazards. However, there are certainly hazards in offices that people may not think about on a regular basis. Poor air quality, ineffective lighting and noise, slips, trips and falls, fire hazards, electrical equipment, poor workstation arrangement and improper lifting and storage are all potential safety hazards that can even be found in an office environment. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify fall prevention measures and safe lifting techniques in offices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see BOS-1.2 Office Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause

Oil & Gas Qualified Electrical Workers – Electrical Hazards

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to identify electrical hazards for qualified workers. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-46.2 Electrical Safety for Qualified Workers in Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Oil & Gas Qualified Electrical Workers – Electrical Injuries

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to identify potential electrical injuries. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-46.2 Electrical Safety for Qualified Workers in Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Oil & Gas Qualified Electrical Workers – Electricity Basics

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to recognize how electricity works and its dangers. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-46.2 Electrical Safety for Qualified Workers in Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Oil & Gas Qualified Electrical Workers – Hazard Controls

Electricity is accepted as a source of power without much thought to its hazards, but it’s one of the deadliest hazards in the workplace. Employees who take this course will learn how to identify methods to control and prevent electrical hazards. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-46.2 Electrical Safety for Qualified Workers in Oil and Gas.

Relevant Standards: NFPA 70E 2018; 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S and 1926 Subpart K

Oil Rig Safety: Chemical Hazards

Oil rigs have been around in some form or another for decades, but all of the various machines and pieces of equipment can be hazardous, particularly to new rig workers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize common chemical hazards on oil and gas sites.

This microlearning course is a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-18.2 Oil Rig Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Oil Rig Safety: Equipment Hazards

Oil rigs have been around in some form or another for decades, but all of the various machines and pieces of equipment can be hazardous, particularly to new rig workers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize common environmental hazards on oil and gas sites.

This microlearning course is a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-18.2 Oil Rig Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Oil Rig Safety: Terminology and Safety Programs

Oil rigs have been around in some form or another for decades, but all of the various machines and pieces of equipment can be hazardous, particularly to new rig workers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify basic terminology and safety programs on oil and gas sites.

This microlearning course is a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-18.2 Oil Rig Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Oil Rig Safety: Work Environment Hazards

Oil rigs have been around in some form or another for decades, but all of the various machines and pieces of equipment can be hazardous, particularly to new rig workers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify common work area hazards on oil and gas sites.

This microlearning course is a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-18.2 Oil Rig Safety.

Relevant Standards: Built in Q1 2020 from the Q4 2019 rebuild of OGS-18

Passenger Van Driver: Before Driving

The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration estimates that dozens of people are killed every year in van crashes, particularly rollovers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify required practices before driving passenger vans. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-8.2 15 or Fewer Passenger Van Driver Safety.

Passenger Van Driver: Hazards of Passenger Vans

The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration estimates that dozens of people are killed every year in van crashes, particularly rollovers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the hazards of driving passenger vans. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-8.2 15 or Fewer Passenger Van Driver Safety.

Passenger Van Driver: Safe Driving

Driving a van or any large passenger vehicle is different from driving a car or pickup truck. Vans can be slower to accelerate and require more stopping distance than cars, especially when the van is loaded with passengers and cargo. Because of this, van drivers need to take extra care. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify safe practices while driving passenger vans.

Personal Protective Equipment: Eye and Face Protection

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize the various types of eye and face PPE and their uses. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-1.2 Personal Protective Equipment.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1915.157

Personal Protective Equipment: Full Body Protection

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize the various types of full body PPE and their uses. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-1.2 Personal Protective Equipment.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1915.157

Personal Protective Equipment: Head Protection

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize the various types of head PPE and their uses. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-1.2 Personal Protective Equipment.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1915.157

Personal Protective Equipment: Leg and Foot Protection

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize the various types of full body PPE and their uses. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see PPE-1.2 Personal Protective Equipment.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1915.157

Personal Protective Equipment: Types of Gloves

While on the job, using a tool improperly or not paying attention while working around heavy machinery can lead to damaging various parts of a worker?s hands. Because of the complexity of the hand, repairing the hand to its previous abilities may be difficult. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, an average of 140,000 hand injuries were reported in 2011 resulting in about 5 days away from work per injury. While most serious hand injuries occur as a result of physical trauma from machinery, other hand injuries can be caused by ergonomic hazards due to repetitive motion. While these injuries are less severe, they result in the most days away from work compared to other injuries. Learners who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of types of gloves and their properties. see PPE-1.2 Personal Protective Equipment.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.138 Hand Protection

Portable Fire Extinguishers: Uses of Extinguishers

If you encounter a fire at home or on the job, a portable fire extinguisher can help you to protect yourself and possibly stop the fire in its tracks. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the uses of a portable fire extinguisher and the five classes of fire. This microlearning course is part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see FRS-2.2 Portable Fire Extinguishers.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.157

Portable Fire Extinguishers: When and How to Use

If you encounter a fire at home or on the job, a portable fire extinguisher can help you to protect yourself and possibly stop the fire in its tracks. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize when and how to use a portable fire extinguisher. This microlearning course is part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see FRS-2.2 Portable Fire Extinguishers.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.157

Radiation Safety: Exposure Controls

Radiation is much more common than we realize. Low levels of background radiation exist all around us, and most of us are exposed to natural and man-made radiation every day. Radiation has many practical uses, including food preparation, energy production, and medical research and procedures. Most radiation isn’t harmful to people in the doses they generally receive. However, some work environments may expose workers to higher doses of radiation. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify controls designed to prevent radiation exposure. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see RAD-1 Radiation Safety Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1096, 10 CFR 835

Radiation Safety: Exposure Hazards and Workplace Controls

Radiation is much more common than we realize. Low levels of background radiation exist all around us, and most of us are exposed to natural and man-made radiation every day. Radiation has many practical uses, including food preparation, energy production, and medical research and procedures. Most radiation isn’t harmful to people in the doses they generally receive. However, some work environments may expose workers to higher doses of radiation. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify radiation exposure hazards and workplace controls. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see RAD-1 Radiation Safety Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1096, 10 CFR 835

Radiation Safety: Radiation Types and Effects

Radiation is much more common than we realize. Low levels of background radiation exist all around us, and most of us are exposed to natural and man-made radiation every day. Radiation has many practical uses, including food preparation, energy production, and medical research and procedures. Most radiation isn’t harmful to people in the doses they generally receive. However, some work environments may expose workers to higher doses of radiation. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize types and effects of radiation. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see RAD-1 Radiation Safety Awareness.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1096, 10 CF29 CFR 1910.1096, 10 CFR 835

Respiratory Protection Oil and Gas: General Requirements

Oil and gas exploration and production often causes workers to encounter hazardous atmospheres. Hazardous chemical fumes, low oxygen environments, and even some types of dust particles can cause injury or illness to workers. If the atmosphere becomes hazardous to breathe, employees may require respiratory protection. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize general requirements for respiratory protection. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-16.2 Respiratory Protection for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection Oil and Gas: Inhalation Hazards

Oil and gas exploration and production often causes workers to encounter hazardous atmospheres. Hazardous chemical fumes, low oxygen environments, and even some types of dust particles can cause injury or illness to workers. If the atmosphere becomes hazardous to breathe, employees may require respiratory protection. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize types of inhalation hazards on their sites. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-16.2 Respiratory Protection for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection Oil and Gas: Respirator Styles and Features

Oil and gas exploration and production often causes workers to encounter hazardous atmospheres. Hazardous chemical fumes, low oxygen environments, and even some types of dust particles can cause injury or illness to workers. If the atmosphere becomes hazardous to breathe, employees may require respiratory protection. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify styles and features of respirators. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-16.2 Respiratory Protection for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection Oil and Gas: Respirator Types and Characteristics

Oil and gas exploration and production often causes workers to encounter hazardous atmospheres. Hazardous chemical fumes, low oxygen environments, and even some types of dust particles can cause injury or illness to workers. If the atmosphere becomes hazardous to breathe, employees may require respiratory protection. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify types of respirators and their characteristics. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-16.2 Respiratory Protection for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection Oil and Gas: Use and Maintenance

Oil and gas exploration and production often causes workers to encounter hazardous atmospheres. Hazardous chemical fumes, low oxygen environments, and even some types of dust particles can cause injury or illness to workers. If the atmosphere becomes hazardous to breathe, employees may require respiratory protection. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize considerations for using, cleaning and maintaining a respirator. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-16.2 Respiratory Protection for Oil and Gas Personnel.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection: Air-Purifying Respirators

Respirators are generally divided into two groups: air-purifying respirators, or APRs, which filter the outside air, and atmosphere-supplying respirators, or ASRs, which provide the user with a source of clean air. Air-purifying respirators protect workers? lungs from airborne particles and contamination, but workers may need more than one type of respirator or filter if they’ll be exposed to multiple types of contaminants. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to identify types of air-purifying respirators and their characteristics, styles and features. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see RSP-1.2 Respiratory Protection.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection: Atmosphere-Supplying Respirators

Respirators are generally divided into two groups: air-purifying respirators, or APRs, which filter the outside air, and atmosphere-supplying respirators, or ASRs, which provide the user with a source of clean air. ASRs supply users with breathing air from a source other than the surrounding environment. They are useful for situations where filtering cannot protect against the hazardous atmosphere, such as when there is not enough oxygen in the air, or when there are multiple or unknown hazards to protect against. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to identify types of atmosphere-supplying respirators and their characteristics, styles and features. For a more complete training experience, see RSP-1.2 Respiratory Protection. This course is presented in English and Spanish.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection: Basic Requirements

In work environments where respiratory hazards exist, respirators are a crucial part of keeping workers safe. However, wearing a respirator isn?t as simple as just grabbing one off the shelf and walking into a hazardous atmosphere. It?s important for workers to know if they can wear the respirator they need to complete their duties, and how to wear it so they can stay safe. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to recognize general requirements for respiratory protection. For a more complete training experience, see RSP-1.2 Respiratory Protection.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection: Respiratory Hazards

Respiratory hazards are common in many work environments. A respirator is a form of personal protective equipment, or PPE, that serves as a last line of defense against respiratory hazards. After implementing all of the other levels of the hierarchy of controls, employers must determine what inhalation hazards still exist. The type and severity of the remaining hazards will determine what kind of respiratory protection workers will need. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to identify types of inhalation hazards, including gases and vapors, oxygen deficiency, and airborne particles. For a more complete training experience, see RSP-1.2 Respiratory Protection.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134

Respiratory Protection: Wearing and Maintaining Respirators

In work environments where respiratory hazards exist, respirators are a crucial part of keeping workers safe. However, a respirator that?s not well-maintained or worn properly won?t protect workers how it should. Workers need to know how to clean, maintain, and wear respirators that they require for their job duties. Learners who successfully complete this module should be able to recognize considerations for using, cleaning and maintaining a respirator. For a more complete training experience, see RSP-1.2 Respiratory Protection.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134

Retail Safety: Emergency Preparation and Response

The retail and wholesale industry experiences around 800,000 serious injuries each year. That’s roughly 20% of all serious workplace injuries in the U.S. Fortunately, most of these injuries are preventable with proper safe work practices. This course will help employees recognize general strategies for emergency preparation and response. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see RET-17.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause; 29 CFR 1910.1020; 29 CFR 1910.1200; 29 CFR 1910.132; 29 CFR 1910.138; 29 CFR 1910.139; 29 CFR 1910.151

Retail Safety: OSHA

The retail and wholesale industry experiences around 800,000 serious injuries each year. That’s roughly 20% of all serious workplace injuries in the U.S. Fortunately, most of these injuries are preventable with proper safe work practices. This course will help employees identify OSHA’s requirements for workplace injuries. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see RET-17.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause; 29 CFR 1910.1020; 29 CFR 1910.1200; 29 CFR 1910.132; 29 CFR 1910.138; 29 CFR 1910.139; 29 CFR 1910.151

Retail Safety: Retail Environment Hazards

The retail and wholesale industry experiences around 800,000 serious injuries each year. That’s roughly 20% of all serious workplace injuries in the U.S. Fortunately, most of these injuries are preventable with proper safe work practices. This course will help employees recognize common hazards in the retail environment. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see RET-17.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause; 29 CFR 1910.1020; 29 CFR 1910.1200; 29 CFR 1910.132; 29 CFR 1910.138; 29 CFR 1910.139; 29 CFR 1910.151

Retail Safety: The Hierarchy of Hazard Controls

The retail and wholesale industry experiences around 800,000 serious injuries each year. That’s roughly 20% of all serious workplace injuries in the U.S. Fortunately, most of these injuries are preventable with proper safe work practices. This course will help employees recognize controls for common hazards in the retail environment. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see RET-17.2.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause; 29 CFR 1910.1020; 29 CFR 1910.1200; 29 CFR 1910.132; 29 CFR 1910.138; 29 CFR 1910.139; 29 CFR 1910.151

Rigging Safety: Employee Roles

Rigging is a complex operation that requires extensive planning to keep everyone safe. An unstable load, a misinterpreted hand signal, lack of experience, lack of maintenance, and infrequent inspections can all cause incidents. Only trained and qualified individuals should ever attempt to perform rigging operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize employee roles in rigging operations.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.184; 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC; 29 CFR 1926.753

Rigging Safety: Rigging and Lifting Hazards

Rigging is a complex operation that requires extensive planning to keep everyone safe. An unstable load, a misinterpreted hand signal, lack of experience, lack of maintenance, and infrequent inspections can all cause incidents. Only trained and qualified individuals should ever attempt to perform rigging operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify procedures for rigging and lifting loads.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC; 29 CFR 1926.753

Rigging Safety: Rigging and Lifting Procedures

Rigging is a complex operation that requires extensive planning to keep everyone safe. An unstable load, a misinterpreted hand signal, lack of experience, lack of maintenance, and infrequent inspections can all cause incidents. Only trained and qualified individuals should ever attempt to perform rigging operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize hazards associated with rigging and lifting.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC; 29 CFR 1926.753

Rigging Safety: Rigging Inspections

Rigging is a complex operation that requires extensive planning to keep everyone safe. An unstable load, a misinterpreted hand signal, lack of experience, lack of maintenance, and infrequent inspections can all cause incidents. Only trained and qualified individuals should ever attempt to perform rigging operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify types and components of rigging inspections.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a broader awareness-level training experience, see OCS-3.2 Rigging Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.184; 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC; 29 CFR 1926.753

Rigging Safety: Tools and Equipment

Rigging is a complex operation that requires extensive planning to keep everyone safe. An unstable load, a misinterpreted hand signal, lack of experience, lack of maintenance, and infrequent inspections can all cause incidents. Only trained and qualified individuals should ever attempt to perform rigging operations. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify tools and equipment used in rigging.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926 Subpart CC; 29 CFR 1926.753; 29 CFR 1910.179

Road Rage: Aggressive Driving Behaviors

Road rage is incredibly dangerous, causing almost 2/3 of all traffic fatalities. It is sadly also very common; in one survey nearly 90% of drivers stated that they had witnessed a road rage incident in the past month. This course is designed to give drivers the information and skills necessary to react as safely as possible to potentially dangerous situations on the road. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize the signs of aggressive driving behavior in themselves and others. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-3.2 Road Rage.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Road Rage: Preventing Aggressive Driving

Road rage is incredibly dangerous, causing almost 2/3 of all traffic fatalities. It is sadly also very common; in one survey nearly 90% of drivers stated that they had witnessed a road rage incident in the past month. This course is designed to give drivers the information and skills necessary to react as safely as possible to potentially dangerous situations on the road. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify constructive responses and prevention measures that can be used to avoid injury due to aggressive drivers/driving. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-3.2 Road Rage.

Relevant Standards: OSHA General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Safe Trip Planning: DOT Trip Requirements for Commercial Motor Vehicles

Because most freight is intended to reach its destination by a certain date and time, proper planning is necessary. Inclement weather, traffic, road construction, fuel and food stops, and repairs can all affect how quickly a vehicle can travel its intended route. This course will help learners recognize practical and safety considerations for over-the-road travel and long-range trip planning, including DOT inspection and hours of service limitations. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-4.2 Safe Trip Planning for Over the Road Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 395.3; 49 CFR 396.11

Safe Trip Planning: Over-the-Road Travel Considerations

Because most freight is intended to reach its destination by a certain date and time, proper planning is necessary. Inclement weather, traffic, road construction, fuel and food stops, and repairs can all affect how quickly a vehicle can travel its intended route. This course will help learners recognize practical and safety considerations for over-the-road travel and long-range trip planning, including routing, scheduling, contingency and emergency planning. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-4.2 Safe Trip Planning for Over the Road Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 395.3

Safe Trip Planning: Safe Practices for Over-the-Road Drivers

Because most freight is intended to reach its destination by a certain date and time, proper planning is necessary. Inclement weather, traffic, road construction, fuel and food stops, and repairs can all affect how quickly a vehicle can travel its intended route. This course will help learners recognize practical and safety considerations for over-the-road travel and long-range trip planning, including scheduling, contingency and emergency planning, and arrival procedures. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-4.2 Safe Trip Planning for Over the Road Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 393.42

Scaffold Safety: Scaffold Regulatory Requirements

Scaffolding is a very versatile and useful tool for construction or repair of buildings. It can be assembled and disassembled easily and can be built very tall or wide, depending on the building’s shape. But as with any tool, using scaffolding requires care and knowledge. This course will teach employees the basics of staying safe while working on scaffolds. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SCF-1 Scaffold Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.28, 29 CFR 1926.454

Scaffold Safety: Types and Hazards of Scaffolds

Scaffolding is a very versatile and useful tool for construction or repair of buildings. It can be assembled and disassembled easily and can be built very tall or wide, depending on the building’s shape. But as with any tool, using scaffolding requires care and knowledge. This course will teach employees the basics of staying safe while working on scaffolds. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SCF-1 Scaffold Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.28, 29 CFR 1926.454

Scissor Lift Basics

Scissor lifts are popular in many job settings because they provide a mobile elevated work surface that is flexible, quick to set up, and relatively safe and easy to use. However, they do still come with hazards, and injuries on scissor lifts can be severe. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SCF-2 Scissor Lift Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.454, 29 CFR 1926.452(w), 29 CFR 1910.27-29

Scissor Lift Safety: Hazards and Safe Operations

Scissor lifts are popular in many job settings because they provide a mobile elevated work surface that is flexible, quick to set up, and relatively safe and easy to use. However, they do still come with hazards, and injuries on scissor lifts can be severe. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SCF-2 Scissor Lift Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.454, 29 CFR 1926.452(w), 29 CFR 1910.27-29

Scissor Lift Safety: Hazards and Safe Operations

Scissor lifts are popular in many job settings because they provide a mobile elevated work surface that is flexible, quick to set up, and relatively safe and easy to use. However, they do still come with hazards, and injuries on scissor lifts can be severe. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SCF-2 Scissor Lift Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.454, 29 CFR 1926.452(w), 29 CFR 1910.27-29

Securing Loads and Cargo: Cargo Inspections

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize requirements for cargo inspections. For a more complete training, see DRV-9.2 Securing Loads and Cargo.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 393 Subpart I

Securing Loads and Cargo: Recommended Practices

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize identify recommended practices for loading and transporting cargo. For a more complete training, see DRV-9.2 Securing Loads and Cargo.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 393 Subpart I

Securing Loads and Cargo: Securement Systems

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to identify approved securement systems and their characteristics. For a more complete training, see DRV-9.2 Securing Loads and Cargo.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 393 Subpart I

Semi-Truck and Box Truck: DOT Requirements for Drivers

Most products that people use are moved over the road in trucks. However, truck drivers require extensive training over how to operate their vehicles, keep good records and logs, and how to take care of themselves and their vehicles. In addition to company and vehicle-specific training, this course can give drivers an initial frame of reference over their responsibilities and job duties. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify general Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements for truck drivers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-2.2 DOT Requirements for Semi-Truck and Box Truck Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 380 Subpart E

Semi-Truck and Box Truck: Driver Wellness

Most products that people use are moved over the road in trucks. However, truck drivers require extensive training over how to operate their vehicles, keep good records and logs, and how to take care of themselves and their vehicles. In addition to company and vehicle-specific training, this course can give drivers an initial frame of reference over their responsibilities and job duties. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify recommended driver wellness practices. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-2.2 DOT Requirements for Semi-Truck and Box Truck Drivers.

Semi-Truck and Box Truck: Hours of Service and Logging

Most products that people use are moved over the road in trucks. However, truck drivers require extensive training over how to operate their vehicles, keep good records and logs, and how to take care of themselves and their vehicles. In addition to company and vehicle-specific training, this course can give drivers an initial frame of reference over their responsibilities and job duties. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify hours of service and logging requirements for drivers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-2.2 DOT Requirements for Semi-Truck and Box Truck Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 395

Semi-Truck and Box Truck: Inspections and Reporting

Most products that people use are moved over the road in trucks. However, truck drivers require extensive training over how to operate their vehicles, keep good records and logs, and how to take care of themselves and their vehicles. In addition to company and vehicle-specific training, this course can give drivers an initial frame of reference over their responsibilities and job duties. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify Department of Transportation (DOT) inspection and reporting requirements for truck drivers. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DOT-2.2 DOT Requirements for Semi-Truck and Box Truck Drivers.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 396.11

Severe Weather Awareness

Many jobs require outdoor work on a regular basis, and working outdoors can be fun at times, but working out in the elements can range from pleasant to uncomfortable, to even dangerous during severe weather. Workers who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of severe weather hazards and how to react when severe weather strikes during work processes. Employees will learn to identify hazards associated with severe weather and standard protocols to follow during severe weather events. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SVW-1.2 Severe Weather and Outdoor Work.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Severe Weather: Flash Floods

Many jobs require outdoor work on a regular basis, and working outdoors can be fun at times, but working out in the elements can range from pleasant to uncomfortable, to even dangerous during severe weather. Workers who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of severe weather hazards and how to react when severe weather strikes during work processes. Employees will learn to identify hazards associated with flash floods and standard procedures to follow. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SVW-1.2 Severe Weather and Outdoor Work.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Severe Weather: Thunderstorms

Many jobs require outdoor work on a regular basis, and working outdoors can be fun at times, but working out in the elements can range from pleasant to uncomfortable, to even dangerous during severe weather. Workers who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of severe weather hazards and how to react when severe weather strikes during work processes. Employees will learn to identify hazards associated with thunderstorms and standard procedures to follow. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SVW-1.2 Severe Weather and Outdoor Work.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Severe Weather: Tornadoes

Many jobs require outdoor work on a regular basis, and working outdoors can be fun at times, but working out in the elements can range from pleasant to uncomfortable, to even dangerous during severe weather. Workers who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge of severe weather hazards and how to react when severe weather strikes during work processes. Employees will learn to identify hazards associated with tornadoes and standard procedures to follow. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see SVW-1.2 Severe Weather and Outdoor Work.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR General Duty Clause Section 5(a)(1)

Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for NY Employees – Forms of Discrimination and Harassment

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners in New York who successfully complete this course will be able to identify forms of discrimination and harassment. This microlearning course represents part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-24.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees In New York.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR General Duty CNew York State Human Rights Law; NYC Local Law 96; The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act;

Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for NY Employees – Reporting Discrimination and Harassment

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners in New York who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize procedures for reporting discrimination and harassment. This microlearning course represents part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-24.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees In New York.

Relevant Standards: New York State Human Rights Law; NYC Local Law 96; The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act;

Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for NY Employees – Types of Discrimination

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners in New York who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize types of discrimination. This microlearning course represents part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-24.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees In New York.

Relevant Standards: New York State Human Rights Law; NYC Local Law 96; The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act;

Sexual Harassment for CA Employees – Abusive Conduct

Sexual harassment and discrimination are concerns for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment or discrimination occurs in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the characteristics and types of abusive conduct in the workplace. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for one hour of harassment and discrimination training on its own. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-21.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Employees – Anti-Harassment Policy

Sexual harassment and discrimination are concerns for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment or discrimination occurs in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify essential elements of anti-harassment policies and investigations. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for one hour of harassment and discrimination training on its own. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-21.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Employees – FEHA Overview

Sexual harassment and discrimination are concerns for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment or discrimination occurs in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify key elements and requirements of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for one hour of harassment and discrimination training on its own. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-21.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees in California.

Relevant Standards: California Fair Employment and Housing Act

Sexual Harassment for CA Employees – Protected Classes Part 1

Sexual harassment and discrimination are concerns for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment or discrimination occurs in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize protected classes under California law. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for one hour of harassment and discrimination training on its own. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-21.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Employees – Protected Classes Part 2

Sexual harassment and discrimination are concerns for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment or discrimination occurs in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize protected classes under California law. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for one hour of harassment and discrimination training on its own. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-21.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Employees – Protected Classes Part 3

Sexual harassment and discrimination are concerns for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment or discrimination occurs in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize protected classes under California law. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for one hour of harassment and discrimination training on its own. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-21.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Employees – Types of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment and discrimination are concerns for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment or discrimination occurs in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize types and characteristics of sexual harassment. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for one hour of harassment and discrimination training on its own. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-21.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Employees in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Managers – Abusive Conduct

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the characteristics and types of abusive conduct in the workplace. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for two hours of harassment and discrimination training for supervisory employees. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-18.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Managers – Anti-Harassment Policy

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify essential elements of anti-harassment policies and investigations. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for two hours of harassment and discrimination training for supervisory employees. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-18.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Managers – FEHA Overview

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify key elements and requirements of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for two hours of harassment and discrimination training for supervisory employees. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-18.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in California.

Relevant Standards: California Fair Employment and Housing Act

Sexual Harassment for CA Managers – Protected Classes Part 1

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize protected classes under California law. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for two hours of harassment and discrimination training for supervisory employees. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-18.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Managers – Protected Classes Part 2

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize protected classes under California law. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for two hours of harassment and discrimination training for supervisory employees. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-18.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Managers – Protected Classes Part 3

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize protected classes under California law. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for two hours of harassment and discrimination training for supervisory employees. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-18.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Sexual Harassment for CA Managers – Types of Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is a concern for every business that has more than one employee. When sexual harassment does occur in the workplace, it can create many problems for the victim, co-workers, and the company, including a drop in morale, a loss in productivity, legal action, and a damaged reputation for the company. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize types and characteristics of sexual harassment. This microlearning course represents a small part of a broader topic and does not meet California’s requirement for two hours of harassment and discrimination training for supervisory employees. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-18.2 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination for Managers in California.

Relevant Standards: The Civil Rights Act of 1964; the Americans With Disabilities Act; the Fair Wages Act; the Age Discrimination Act; the Pregnancy Discrimination Act; the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act; the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act; California Government Code, Chapter 6

Signs and Tags: ANSI, APWA and Sign and Tag Maintenance

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires the use of signs and symbols to warn workers about specific hazards in the workplace and tell them how to prevent these hazards from causing harm or injury to employees. The design of these signs is standardized across all types of workplaces so that workers can easily understand their meanings. Workers need to understand the rules that govern safety signs and recognize the meanings of common symbols and colors in order to protect themselves and others from harm. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize labeling standards outlined in ANSI’s pipe labeling standard and the American Public Works Association’s Uniform Color Code. Learners should also be able to identify the importance of properly maintaining accident prevention signs and tags. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-45.2 Accident Prevention Signs and Tags.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.145, 29 CFR 1926.200, ANSI 13.1-2011, APWA Uniform Color Code-1999

Silica Awareness for Construction: Controlling RCS Exposure

Silica, or silicone dioxide, is a common mineral and major component of many types of rock and sand. It can also be found in building materials including concrete, mortar and drywall. Respirable crystalline silica, or RCS, are very small particles of crystalline silica, and are created by cutting, sawing, grinding, drilling, or crushing materials that contain crystalline silica. When employees have successfully completed this course, they should be able to recognize controls to minimize worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS).

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1053; 29 CFR 1926.1153

Silica Awareness for Construction: Preventing RCS Exposure

Silica, or silicone dioxide, is a common mineral and major component of many types of rock and sand. It can also be found in building materials including concrete, mortar and drywall. Respirable crystalline silica, or RCS, are very small particles of crystalline silica, and are created by cutting, sawing, grinding, drilling, or crushing materials that contain crystalline silica. When employees have successfully completed this course, they should be able to recognize methods to prevent worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS).

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1053; 29 CFR 1926.1153

Silica Awareness for Construction: Silica and Your Health

Silica, or silicone dioxide, is a common mineral and major component of many types of rock and sand. It can also be found in building materials including concrete, mortar and drywall. Respirable crystalline silica, or RCS, are very small particles of crystalline silica, and are created by cutting, sawing, grinding, drilling, or crushing materials that contain crystalline silica. When employees have successfully completed this course, they should be able to recognize the health risks of exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS).

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.1053; 29 CFR 1926.115329 CFR 1910.1053; 29 CFR 1926.1153

Slips/Trips/Falls: Elevated Surfaces

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to understand the safety requirements for elevated surfaces. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see STF-1.2 Slips, Trips, and Falls.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.23; 29 CFR 1910.25-27

Slips/Trips/Falls: Holes and Openings

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to understand the requirements for holes and openings. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see STF-1.2 Slips, Trips, and Falls.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.21; 29 CFR 1910.28

Slips/Trips/Falls: Walking and Working Surfaces

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to understand the general requirements for walking and working surfaces. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see STF-1.2 Slips, Trips, and Falls.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.22

Small Spill Response Canada – Best Practices

Many employees work with hazardous chemicals every day. Whenever chemicals are used, there’s always the chances of a spill. Some spills can be cleaned up by workers at the site, while others may require emergency responders. Even simple spills of hazardous chemicals can damage human health and the environment, so employees need to be aware of the hazards of those chemicals and how to clean them up safely. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify procedures and best practices when dealing with small spills This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-9.2 Small Spill Response – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Federal, provincial and territorial OHS and WHMIS regulations

Small Spill Response Canada – Spill Considerations

Many employees work with hazardous chemicals every day. Whenever chemicals are used, there’s always the chances of a spill. Some spills can be cleaned up by workers at the site, while others may require emergency responders. Even simple spills of hazardous chemicals can damage human health and the environment, so employees need to be aware of the hazards of those chemicals and how to clean them up safely. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify considerations when dealing with small spills. This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-9.2 Small Spill Response – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Federal, provincial and territorial OHS and WHMIS regulations

Small Spill Response Canada – Spill Response Info

Many employees work with hazardous chemicals every day. Whenever chemicals are used, there’s always the chances of a spill. Some spills can be cleaned up by workers at the site, while others may require emergency responders. Even simple spills of hazardous chemicals can damage human health and the environment, so employees need to be aware of the hazards of those chemicals and how to clean them up safely. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize sources of spill response information. This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see HZC-9.2 Small Spill Response – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Federal, provincial and territorial OHS and WHMIS regulations

SPCC Canada – Basic OPEP Components

According to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, or CEPA 1999, pollution prevention is “the use of processes, practices, materials, products, substances or energy that avoid or minimize the creation of pollutants and waste and reduce the overall risk to the environment or human health.“ To help prevent and combat oil spills, the National Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime, commonly referred to as the regime, requires all oil handling facilities to have an Oil Pollution Emergency Plan, or an OPEP, in place and for all ships to have a Ship Oil Pollution Emergency Plan, or a SOPEP, in place. This course will teach employees to identify the basic components of OPEPs and SOPEPs. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-3.2can Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Spill prevention, control, and countermeasures requirements under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001

SPCC Canada – Spill Control Measures and Countermeasures

According to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, or CEPA 1999, pollution prevention is “the use of processes, practices, materials, products, substances or energy that avoid or minimize the creation of pollutants and waste and reduce the overall risk to the environment or human health.“ To help prevent and combat oil spills, the National Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime, commonly referred to as the regime, requires all oil handling facilities to have an Oil Pollution Emergency Plan, or an OPEP, in place and for all ships to have a Ship Oil Pollution Emergency Plan, or a SOPEP, in place. This course will teach employees to identify spill countermeasures and the parties involved in spill cleanup. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-3.2can Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Spill prevention, control, and countermeasures requirements under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001

SPCC Canada – Spill Prevention Measures

According to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, or CEPA 1999, pollution prevention is “the use of processes, practices, materials, products, substances or energy that avoid or minimize the creation of pollutants and waste and reduce the overall risk to the environment or human health.“ To help prevent and combat oil spills, the National Oil Spill Preparedness and Response Regime, commonly referred to as the regime, requires all oil handling facilities to have an Oil Pollution Emergency Plan, or an OPEP, in place and for all ships to have a Ship Oil Pollution Emergency Plan, or a SOPEP, in place. This course will teach employees to identify spill prevention measures. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-3.2can Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures – Canada.

Relevant Standards: Spill prevention, control, and countermeasures requirements under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001

SPCC for Oil and Gas: Controls and Countermeasures

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify spill control measures and countermeasures.

Relevant Standards: Oil Pollution Act; EPA Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures program

SPCC for Oil and Gas: SPCC Plan Components

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the basic components of an SPCC plan.

Relevant Standards: Oil Pollution Act; EPA Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures program

SPCC for Oil and Gas: Spill Prevention Measures

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify basic spill prevention measures.

Relevant Standards: Oil Pollution Act; EPA Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures program

SPCC for Oil and Gas: Controls and Countermeasures

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify spill control measures and countermeasures.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-12.2 Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: Oil Pollution Act; EPA Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures program

SPCC for Oil and Gas: SPCC Plan Components

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the basic components of an SPCC plan.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-12.2 Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: Oil Pollution Act; EPA Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures program

SPCC for Oil and Gas: Spill Prevention Measures

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify basic spill prevention measures.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see OGS-12.2 Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures for Oil and Gas Operations.

Relevant Standards: Oil Pollution Act; EPA Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures program

SPCC: Basic Components of an SPCC Plan

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify the basic components of an SPCC plan.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-3.2 Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures.

Relevant Standards: 40 CFR 112

SPCC: Spill Control Measures and Countermeasures

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify spill control measures and countermeasures.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-3.2 Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures.

Relevant Standards: 40 CFR 112

SPCC: Spill Prevention Measures

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a one-gallon oil spill can contaminate up to one million gallons of water. To help protect waterways, the EPA requires all non-transportation facilities that store large amounts of oil to write and follow a spill prevention, control, and countermeasure (SPCC) plan. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify spill prevention measures.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see ENV-3.2 Spill Prevention/Control/Countermeasures.

Relevant Standards: 40 CFR 112

Stormwater Pollution: Advanced Best Management Practices

Stormwater pollution is a concern at virtually all facilities. For industrial facilities who can be required to hold National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, or NPDES, permits, it is critical that all employees understand the consequences of stormwater pollution. When employees have completed this course, they should be able to identify some advanced best-management practices related to stormwater pollution prevention. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see STW-2.2 Stormwater Pollution Prevention for Industrial Operations.

Relevant Standards: EPA 40 CFR 122; National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; NPDES Permit; Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan; SWPPP

Stormwater Pollution: Baseline Best Management Practices

Stormwater pollution is a concern at virtually all facilities. For industrial facilities who can be required to hold National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, or NPDES, permits, it is critical that all employees understand the consequences of stormwater pollution. When employees have completed this course, they should be able to identify some common baseline best management practices related to stormwater pollution prevention. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see STW-2.2 Stormwater Pollution Prevention for Industrial Operations.

Relevant Standards: EPA 40 CFR 122; National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; NPDES Permit; Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan; SWPPP

Stormwater Pollution: Water Pollution Regulations

Stormwater pollution is a concern at virtually all facilities. For industrial facilities who can be required to hold National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, or NPDES, permits, it is critical that all employees understand the consequences of stormwater pollution. When employees have completed this course, they should be able to recognize the elements of stormwater pollution regulations. This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see STW-2.2 Stormwater Pollution Prevention for Industrial Operations.

Relevant Standards: EPA 40 CFR 122; National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; NPDES Permit; Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan; SWPPP

Struck-By & Caught-Between Hazards in Manufacturing

Manufacturing facilities have a wide variety of machines, heavy equipment and moving parts. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that an average of 21,000 manufacturing workers are struck by and injured by objects or equipment each year, and an average of 12,000 manufacturing workers are injured by being caught in or between pieces of equipment. Workers in manufacturing facilities should be aware of how to protect themselves from the hazards of their facilities and the equipment they use. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize struck-by and caught-between hazards in manufacturing facilities, and identify general strategies for working safely around those hazards.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1910.212; 1910.147, 1910.28, 1910.176, 1910.178, 1910.132

The North American Cargo Securement Standard

After completing this snippet, employees should be able to recognize requirements of the North American Cargo Securement Standard and other cargo regulations. For a more complete training, see DRV-9.2 Securing Loads and Cargo.

Relevant Standards: 49 CFR 393 Subpart I

Time Management Skills – Accomplishing Goals

Time management is important for employees at all levels, as when done poorly, it can have a ripple effect on the company’s workers. Done well, workers who apply time management techniques carefully plan their time and accomplish their goals. This can lead to improved relationships, both inside and outside of work, more free time, and career advancement. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize time management techniques to help them accomplish their goals. This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see SFT-3.2 Time Management Skills.

Time Management Skills – Effective Strategies

Time management is important for employees at all levels, as when done poorly, it can have a ripple effect on the company’s workers. Done well, workers who apply time management techniques carefully plan their time and accomplish their goals. This can lead to improved relationships, both inside and outside of work, more free time, and career advancement. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify effective time management strategies. This microlearning course covers part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see SFT-3.2 Time Management Skills.

Vehicle Backing Safety: Backing Large Vehicles

Even though most of us spend less than 1% of our driving time in reverse, the National Safety Council estimates that one in four vehicle accidents occur while backing, and that most backing accidents are caused by drivers using poor backing techniques. Backing can be particularly hazardous for drivers on the job, especially when backing large vehicles or vehicles with trailers. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify general backing hazards and safe practices for larger vehicles. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-7.2 Vehicle Backing Safety.

Relevant Standards: 29 CFR 1926.601(b)

Vehicle Backing Safety: General Vehicle Backing

Even though most of us spend less than 1% of our driving time in reverse, the National Safety Council estimates that one in four vehicle accidents occur while backing, and that most backing accidents are caused by drivers using poor backing techniques. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to identify general backing hazards and safe practices when backing. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see DRV-7.2 Vehicle Backing Safety.

Violence in the Workplace Canada: High Risk Jobs

Workplace violence can include any threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening behaviour at work. Statistics Canada estimates that 350,000 Canadian workers are subjected to threatening or violent situations at work every year. Unfortunately, workers and workplaces are often affected by violence even when they aren’t the intended target. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify types of workplace violence and high-risk occupations. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-7.2can Violence in the Workplace Canada.

Violence in the Workplace Canada: Preventive Measures

Workplace violence can include any threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening behaviour at work. Statistics Canada estimates that 350,000 Canadian workers are subjected to threatening or violent situations at work every year. Unfortunately, workers and workplaces are often affected by violence even when they aren’t the intended target. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify measures in their workplace that can help prevent workplace violence. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-7.2can Violence in the Workplace Canada.

Violence in the Workplace Canada: Warning Signs

Workplace violence can include any threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening behaviour at work. Statistics Canada estimates that 350,000 Canadian workers are subjected to threatening or violent situations at work every year. Unfortunately, workers and workplaces are often affected by violence even when they aren’t the intended target. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize potential behaviours and symptoms that could lead to violence. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-7.2can Violence in the Workplace Canada.

Violence in the Workplace: High Risk Jobs

Workplace violence can unexpectedly occur in any workplace setting. It is estimated that almost 2 million Americans are victims of some form of workplace violence each year. Most instances of workplace violence do not end in homicide. Unfortunately, workplace violence is a real, significant threat to workers health and safety. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify types of workplace violence and high-risk occupations. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-7.2 Violence in the Workplace.

Violence in the Workplace: Preventive Measures

Workplace violence can unexpectedly occur in any workplace setting. It is estimated that almost 2 million Americans are victims of some form of workplace violence each year. Most instances of workplace violence do not end in homicide. Unfortunately, workplace violence is a real, significant threat to workers health and safety. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to identify measures in their workplace that can help prevent workplace violence. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-7.2 Violence in the Workplace.

Violence in the Workplace: Warning Signs

Workplace violence can unexpectedly occur in any workplace setting. It is estimated that almost 2 million Americans are victims of some form of workplace violence each year. Most instances of workplace violence do not end in homicide. Unfortunately, workplace violence is a real, significant threat to workers health and safety. Learners who successfully complete this course will be able to recognize potential behaviors and symptoms that could lead to violence. This microlearning course addresses a specific aspect of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see HRM-7.2 Violence in the Workplace.

Warehouse Safety: Material Handling

In the United States alone, there are more than one million warehouse workers. These workers are exposed to many hazards, including forklifts, chemicals, and heavy loads. By knowing common risks and how to avoid them, workers can greatly reduce the chance of being injured on the job. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize safe material handling and storage practices.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see WHS-1.2 Warehouse Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.23; OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176

Warehouse Safety: Mechanical Material Handling Equipment

In the United States alone, there are more than one million warehouse workers. These workers are exposed to many hazards, including forklifts, chemicals, and heavy loads. By knowing common risks and how to avoid them, workers can greatly reduce the chance of being injured on the job. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize the hazards and proper use of mechanical material handing equipment.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see WHS-1.2 Warehouse Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.23; OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176

Warehouse Safety: Proper Lifting Techniques

In the United States alone, there are more than one million warehouse workers. These workers are exposed to many hazards, including forklifts, chemicals, and heavy loads. By knowing common risks and how to avoid them, workers can greatly reduce the chance of being injured on the job. Learners who successfully complete this course should be able to recognize safe lifting techniques.

This microlearning course covers a small part of a broader training topic. For a more complete training experience, see WHS-1.2 Warehouse Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.23; OSHA 29 CFR 1910.176

Work Zone and Flagger Safety – Flagging Operations

Despite the many precautions taken by companies and workers, road work zones are still inherently hazardous. Being prepared for what you might experience on a work site is an important part of staying safe. When learners have completed this course, they should be able to recognize procedures for flagging operations. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see WZS-1.2 Work Zone and Flagger Safety.

Relevant Standards: OSHA 29 C1926.200; 1926.201; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices

Work Zone and Flagger Safety – Pedestrian Safety

Despite the many precautions taken by companies and workers, road work zones are still inherently hazardous. Being prepared for what you might experience on a work site is an important part of staying safe. When learners have completed this course, they should be able to recognize pedestrian safety measures in work zones. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see WZS-1.2 Work Zone and Flagger Safety.

Relevant Standards: 1926.200; 1926.201; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices

Work Zone and Flagger Safety – Work Zone Hazards

Despite the many precautions taken by companies and workers, road work zones are still inherently hazardous. Being prepared for what you might experience on a work site is an important part of staying safe. When learners have completed this course, they should be able to recognize work zone hazards. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see WZS-1.2 Work Zone and Flagger Safety.

Relevant Standards: 1926.200; 1926.201; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices

Work Zone and Flagger Safety – Work Zone Protections

Despite the many precautions taken by companies and workers, road work zones are still inherently hazardous. Being prepared for what you might experience on a work site is an important part of staying safe. When learners have completed this course, they should be able to recognize work zone protections. This microlearning course represents part of a broader topic. For a more complete training experience, see WZS-1.2 Work Zone and Flagger Safety.

Relevant Standards: 1926.200; 1926.201; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices

Working from Heights – Canada

Falls from even as little as one metre can cause serious injury, or even death, and are one of the leading causes of injury and death in the workplace. In Canada, provinces and territories set their own regulations, but this course is based on Ontario’s standards as well as best practices. Fall protection is generally grouped into two categories: passive or active fall protection. Passive fall protection methods include guardrails and netting. If it is not enough, active fall protection is required. This course will provide an overview of active fall protection systems. It is primarily for employees who work at heights in Canada.

Relevant Standards: Canada Labour Code, Canada Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, O. Reg. 213-91, O. Reg. 297-13